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I'm learning the Doctor Who Roleplaying Game by Cubicle 7. I don't have the rulebook yet, but I've watched a few videos and read some reviews, when a question emerged.

As far as I know, the skill list are:

  • Athletics
  • Convince
  • Craft
  • Fighting
  • Knowledge
  • Marksman
  • Medicine
  • Science
  • Subterfuge
  • Survival
  • Technology
  • Transport

As I see it, pure science is knowledge, and practical science is technology. So what just "science" is in terms of the game? When does GM is supposed to explicitly ask for a Science check, but not Knowledge of science or Technology check?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @TheoreticalPerson Please don't answer in comments on this stack. Here's our policy. We reserve comments on questions for requesting clarification, or minor meta or moderation matters. As a rule of thumb: if you're trying to work toward a solution or resolution of the issue, it doesn't belong in comments. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Feb 13 '18 at 19:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ima downvote for lack of research. (If you know the rulebook answers the question… get the rulebook. Or in other words, I'll help sort this downward in “value to others”, since most people who care about the game have the game and don't need this question answered…) \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Feb 14 '18 at 2:30
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From the rulebook (p62):

...the Science skill measures just how knowledgeable the character is when it comes to and all the stuff that makes the universe go around. There’s a little crossover with the Medicine and Technology skills, but if the task requires less repairing people or gadgets, and more contemplating the wild pseudoscience or in-depth theory, then Science is going to be the skill of choice.

Or in other words, Science is science (physics, chemistry, biology, and so on) and Technology is technology (hacking, repairing, and deciphering devices). The Knowledge skill specifically excludes categories covered by other skills (Science, Technology, Medicine, etc), and functions more as a "humanities" skill (history, law, etc).

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