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Is it possible to cast Magic Jar from the host body? If yes, is the ex host body treated as the starting body described in the spell?

Some scenarios I would like considered are:

  • What happens to the first container and first possessed body upon casting of magic jar the second time?

  • Does the possessed body count as "your body" for the subsequent spell castings?

  • If the 2nd host is killed, do you return to body of the first host? (in other words, does the spell daisy chain?)

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No, not according to RAW.

The spell description makes a clear distinction between your body (described respectively as 'your body' or 'your living body') and the possessed body (described as 'target's body' or 'host body'). Therefore, as specified in the spell, Magic Jar must be cast from your body not the host body.

Your body falls into a catatonic state as your soul leaves it and enters the container you used for the spell's material component.

The spell never mixes the two terms and distinguishes what you can do from your body, the host body, and the soul container. I would say you cannot chain the Magic Jar spell as suggested above. Sadly, many 5e spells appear to be weaker or less versatile than their older versions. If you would like to play around with this in 5e, it would be homebrew territory.

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Oof. Four questions in one post! Well:

  • Yes, you can cast Magic Jar while in another body, but it might not do very much for you. As the spell specifies, you retain the use of your own class features, which includes casting the spell. Let's look at the cases you specified to see what happens, though.
  • The second time you cast, your original body is already in a catatonic state somewhere, and the host body's soul is in the jar from the first spell. Your soul, due to the spell cast, moves into a second jar, but the first casting of the spell hasn't been dispelled (the only valid termination according to the spell description). Since none of the conditions that would cause the first soul to return to its body or perish have yet been met, it remains in the jar. As far as the first host body, the spell doesn't specify what would happen to it, but it seems to imply that soul-less bodies are in general catatonic; presumably, it would fall to the floor.
  • No possessed body ever counts as "your body" according to this spell. Your body is still your body (wherever you happen to have left it), no matter how many host bodies you move through. Importantly, according to the spell as written, you will be forced to return to your body if any casting of the spell ends. Any of the ongoing Magic Jar castings terminating triggers the clause, "your soul immediately returns to your body."
  • As that suggests, the spell does not daisy chain as written. You could imprison any number of souls in this way, but each successive casting is a separate "option" of Magic Jar, not a buffering link.
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I disagree with the wording that is talked about. The description does not define a multi tiered cast, it only describes one cast from your original body to a jar, and then a host.

Due to this, it wouldn't make sense to word it in any other way than how they did it. They differentiate between the host body and your body in order to clarify the spell, but since they do not mention multiple casts, it would be safe to assume that "your body" is referring to the body that you are casting from, and therefore it would daisy chain the effect.

If a spell is cast from your body, it is cast from the body that you are in control of, so if you cast magic jar from a host body, and destroy the first host body, then your soul would not have to attempt to leave, the soul in the first jar would die, and your original body would be in a catatonic state.

But if the second jar were to then be destroyed, your soul would have no body to go into, since the first host body was killed. However, you would be able to transfer to the jar, and then to your original body, but the jar would still need to remain intact.

Essentially, you would create steps of the spell that you would need to backtrack through in order to safely end the spell completely. Otherwise, there will always be a chance of death from being dispelled, or the jar breaking and not being able to go back one step.

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