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Imprisonment reads:

You create a magical restraint to hold a creature that you can see within range. The target must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw or be bound by the spell, if it succeeds, it is immune to this spell if you cast it again. While affected by this spell, the creature doesn't need to breathe, eat, or drink, and it doesn't age. Divination Spells can't locate or perceive the target.

My question is, is there any reasonable way to get someone out of the various forms of the imprisonment spell?

It seems like, if they fail the save, it's basically just an instant, permanent imprisonment. The spellcaster can state conditions under which the imprisonment can be broken, but they aren't required to, and as a result, they could just leave the imprisoned one stuck in their tomb for life. Is there a way for someone (not the imprisoned one, obviously) to break the imprisonment if there are no conditions for its release?

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Dispel magic

Imprisonment says:

A Dispel Magic spell can end the spell only if it is cast as a 9th-level spell, targeting either the prison or the Special component used to create it.

By design, it appears dispel magic is the best option since it explicitly works with all the prisons as well as on the spell components.

Using an antimagic field might also work but it would be difficult if not impossible to access the prison itself depending on which form of imprisonment is used. It is unclear if placing the spell component within the antimagic field would be enough to release the imprisoned creature.

Of course, you could always try to wish them out with all the conditions and caveats that go along with any use of wish.

Are these options reasonable? Yes

It is important to note that Imprisonment is a 9th level spell whose entire purpose is to imprison a creature. So, of course it is not going to be easy to escape it. It takes a lot of magic to overcome powerful magic. So, yes, these are "reasonable" options.

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