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The Forbiddance spell in 5e says (emphasis mine):

For the duration, creatures can't teleport into the area or use portals, such as those created by the gate spell, to enter the area. The spell proofs the area against planar travel, and therefore prevents creatures from accessing the area by way of the Astral Plane, Ethereal Plane, Feywild, Shadowfell, or the plane shift spell.

Taking this wording exactly as written, it seems like someone within the warded area would be able to teleport out of it without any trouble, although they would not be able to teleport back in. The part about planar travel is less clear. "proof against planar travel" sounds bidirectional, but the examples given all involve entry, not exiting. So, to settle it clearly:

  1. Can I teleport out of the warded area of a Forbiddance spell?
  2. Can I travel to another plane from inside the warded area?

Also for a bonus round: If the answer to 2 is yes, does that mean casting Blink inside the warded area could get me permanently stuck in the ethereal plane?

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Forbiddance has historically been a spell to protect the caster or their chosen subject from intrusion, and this continues in 5E. Nothing in the spell (as you noted in the citation) prevents anyone from leaving the area. Entities are "forbidden" from entering, not departing. So the answers are pretty succinct:

  1. Yes.
  2. Yes.
  3. This would be up to your DM's interpretation of "nearest unoccupied space" the movement limitations of the blink spell as-written. In any case, there are other means to leave the Ethereal plane, so "permanently" is a bit over-stated.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Indeed, by "permanently", I meant that I would remain in the ethereal plane after the spell had ended. \$\endgroup\$ – Ryan C. Thompson Feb 19 '18 at 7:04

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