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My friend recently told me a flaw called Chicken infested which could be used for extremely broken things as well as outright silly things. One of the examples he gave was that since drawing a component from your spell pouch was a free action and dropping something was a free action as well you could draw things and drop them till you draw enough chickens to form a wall. I wanted to ask if there was a rule somewhere that prevented such usages of a supposed flaw.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Are you wondering if there's a general rule that says that that a commoner can't use a flaw to his advantage? Or are you wondering if it's possible to employ the flaw Chicken Infested as a free action on the commoner's turn to build the Great Wall of Chickens? \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Feb 28 '18 at 11:38
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The particular issue of a player creating a wall of chickens as a free action can be reined in if desired. The DM is explicitly allowed to place a cap on the number of free actions a character can take per turn:

Free actions don't take any time at all, though your DM may limit the number of free actions you can perform in a turn.

-Player's Handbook, page 144, the start of the description of free actions)

This still leaves the issue of the commoner providing an infinite lunch of roasted chicken. Unless we interpret the "rules text" of the flaw as saying it's on the player to explain where the chickens are coming from:

No, we don't know where the chickens come from, it's your character.

-Dragon Magazine #330, page 87

That being said, it is a silly feat from a silly article. If the obvious joke is read as legitimate rules text, it will allow silly things. If you are playing a silly game, that is fine.

If you do not want the kind of game where characters can be cursed to carry around pigs (Pig Bond flaw, same column) or to wear an ugly hat to prevent crows from picking out their brain (Peasant Hat flaw), I'd suggest avoiding the article.

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