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Can advantage rolls result in critical hits?

There were two attacks, they both had advantage. The first attack (D20+6) resulted in a 24 (18+6). Then, I rolled a second time for the advantage and got a 20.

The second attack (also D20+6) resulted in a 15 (9+6). Rolling the advantage roll, I got another 20.

In the first attack, 24 is a "higher" roll, but not critical. The 15 is obviously a lower roll, so the 20 would be used instead. Is there a critical hit in either or both cases?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Post has been edited for clarification, thanks for the feedback. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Mar 2, 2018 at 23:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ @kingdangerously You might be confused about how we use "natural" -- we use it in the context of "natural 1" and "natural 20" to reference that number being shown on the die, to distinguish it from getting a 1 or 20 through modifiers. (A roll of 20 has unique effects; a roll of 15 + 5 doesn't, so the "natural" helps make it clear whether we did the first or not.) We don't use that terminology in other contexts, but if we did it would be to reference the exact number on the dice. That means there is no "natural 24 of 26" terminology the hobby uses. Just say "there was an 18 on the die." \$\endgroup\$ Commented Mar 2, 2018 at 23:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ I still find this very confusing. @kingdangerously, can you describe in detail the process you used for the "advantage rolls"? And, on these rolls, was the result 20 on the die, or did you arrive at that after some calculation? \$\endgroup\$
    – mattdm
    Commented Mar 2, 2018 at 23:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ I took a stab at editing to be more clear. I tried to show your step-by-step process. I can't be sure if the 20 on the advantage roll was a (14+6) or a natural 20 without modifiers added, you may want to confirm that it was a natural, no-modifier result. Is this what you meant? If not, feel free to rollback by looking at the edition that best fit your question. And welcome to the site! \$\endgroup\$
    – daze413
    Commented Mar 3, 2018 at 5:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ @kingdangerously the only time you crit is when you roll a 20 on the dice without modifiers. I cant tell from your question but you only crit on a 20 unless you are a fighter champion in which case you crit on 19 and 20. A crit is always a hit and is always higher than any other rolls. a crit always deals double damage. \$\endgroup\$
    – rpgstar
    Commented Mar 6, 2018 at 5:52

2 Answers 2

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These are both critical hits. What's confusing you is that you're misunderstanding how advantage works.

There are no "advantage rolls"

Your question describes the second die in a roll made with advantage as if it's a special, different roll — an "advantage roll". That's incorrect.

When you have advantage, you don't get an extra die that is special. When you have advantage, you roll two dice and pick the best. Then you continue just like a normal single-die roll, adding modifiers and checking for criticals.

So both of your attacks roll two dice.

  • On your first attack your dice came up showing an 18 and a 20, and the order doesn't matter. So you discard the 18 and from now on treat it as if you had rolled a single 20. This is a critical hit because your hit roll shows a natural 20 ("natural" meaning what the die literally shows), which gets modified to 26 by the +6.

  • Your second attack you rolled dice showing a 9 and a 20, so you discard the 9 and keep the 20. This is a critical hit. You add your +6 for a total to-hit result of 26.

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    \$\begingroup\$ By George, I think you've got it! I had to read that so many times to parse out what was actually being asked. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Mar 3, 2018 at 0:36
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The simplest answer is that yes, you still critical hit, because advantage means you roll two d20, pick the highest, then add your attack bonus.

In this case, if you rolled an 18 and a 20 on the dice, the 20 is higher. You add your +6 bonus to that for 26.

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