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I have a few questions regarding the diets of urog player characters. The book (Alien Archive, page 116-117) does not list any unusual dietary requirements under the Racial Traits block, but their description in the text (top of page 117) reads as follows:

Food consumption actually occurs underneath an urog, as it uses the localized electromagnetic effects of its cilia to gradually break molecular bonds and tear tiny pieces off whatever it's consuming. These "bites" are so microscopic that it's often hard for other races to even tell what's happening, with the item in question simply eroding steadily without any obvious markings. Though this allows urogs to eat nearly anything, breaking off and absorbing only the molecules they need and leaving aside the ones they don't, they prefer the silicon-based plant life of their home.

Furthermore, the last paragraph on page 117 goes on to mention a changed diet affecting their abilities.

The race as a whole struck me as interesting and unique, but I want to figure out what should happen when a player decides to play as an urog when it comes to eating.

Does an urog require rations? Does it consume them orally, or via this electromagnetic osmosis effect detailed above?

The book implies that urogs simply eat by gliding about, hovering over whatever they want to eat, be it a steak, a silicon plant, or even just the floor of their starship while they're asleep. This may imply that an urog doesn't need to eat rations, which would be an advantage (albeit mostly for early players) since food wouldn't cost money. But the racial stats block doesn't mention any abilities related to eating. Do they require rations, and if they do, do they eat them via their beaks, or by hovering over them?

Can an urog starve?

Assuming that the answer to the question above states that an urog can eat anything by just hovering over it, would an urog ever starve, or even go hungry at all? It seems to me that being able to eat the floor if necessary precludes the ability to starve outside of intentionally not eating, malfunctioning cilia (which may also render movement impossible), and forcefield prisons.

Can an Urog player-character be poisoned, drugged, or become drunk unwillingly?

Urogs seem to have quite the efficient filtration mechanism, literally stripping only the desired molecules from the surface of their food. This seems like, as the text in the book (below) says, poisoning or drugging an urog may well be impossible, unless their change of environment requires them to undergo a drastic change in diet and eating method.

This particular method of absorbing nutrients makes them nearly impossible to poison or drug, as their bodies simply discard any unnecessary ingested molecules.

However, the player stat block again makes no mention of the player being immune to drugs or poison. I feel like that would be worth whatever equivalent Starfinder has to Race Points, so I'm tentative to claim that an urog PC shouldn't be able to be poisoned, but I'm also unsure how to allow them to be poisoned if they keep their original molecule-stripping method of ingestion.

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You're correct in pointing out being immune to ingested poisons would be a significant advantage. RAW, the Urog need both rations and can indeed be poisoned, as the stat block trumps flavor text.

However, the flavor text can still be resolved without these immunities - the key is the "nearly" in the line "can eat nearly anything," which suggests a bit of hyperbole. A very similar line also shows up for Goblins in the Pathfinder Advanced Race Guide:

Goblins can eat nearly anything, but prefer a diet of meat and consider the flesh of humans and gnomes a rare and difficult-to-obtain delicacy.

Just as you won't find a goblin chewing on an Adamantine bar for breakfast, Urog can not literally eat almost anything. They still require rations, although those rations are likely far different than what as humans would imagine (they are an alien race, after all). Likewise, poison for an Urog would work differently as well, perhaps with the poison disguising its malicious molecules to appear as molecules edible to the Urog.

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