6
\$\begingroup\$

I am converting one of my old D&D 3.5e characters to D&D 5e, to use in another campaign. This character had the feat leadership and used it to build a guild. I saw the chapter in the DMG about followers but I wanted to have something more like a table to calculate the amount of followers and cohorts I have, like it was in 3.5e.

\$\endgroup\$
0

1 Answer 1

4
\$\begingroup\$

Use the D&D 3.5 Leadership feat 'as-is'. D&D 5e doesn't have much in the way of formal mechanics for NPC party members; the major one is an optional loyalty score found on page 93 of the DMG. The general expectation for D&D 5e is that NPC party members are handled in-game through roleplaying.

I will note that looking over the comments on the feat throughout the internet, many players and DMs feel that it is unbalanced in D&D 3.5e.

My opinion is that the the feat is redundant in D&D 5e, and that the heart of having followers is the PC doing the roleplaying in the game to justify having a group of people loyal to them and willing to follow orders even at the risk of death.

The feat's use of a Leadership score is just a formal way of stating a concept that been around since the original release of D&D in 1974: that a PC with sufficient charisma, combined with a high level, attracts followers. D&D 5e reverts more to how older editions handles this: in-game through roleplaying.

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Does D&D 5, like older editions, have rules for gaining followers after acquiring name level? If no, maybe one should not use the phrase "how older editions handle this" in the way it is used in the last sentence. \$\endgroup\$
    – Tommi
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 18:11
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Thanuir There is no name level in D&D 5e, and in older versions you could get hirelings and henchmen before name level. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 18:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Thanuir what name level in classic D&D had was building a stronghold/tower/temple/guild. Hirelings and Henchmen were largely governed by the rules for charisma. Some classes has further specifics. \$\endgroup\$
    – RS Conley
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 0:37
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I personally interpret your followers from having a stronghold etc. as followers, whereas there is absolutely nothing stopping you from hiring help in D&D 3, even if the details for prices were not written in the rules. Also, many older editions had explicit loyalty scores for hired help. So quite a lot more formal than D&D 5. The answer would be improved by changing the last paragraph. \$\endgroup\$
    – Tommi
    Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 6:17

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .