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The 2nd dot of the Parkour Merit says

Cat Leap (••): Your character falls with outstanding grace. When using a Dexterity + Athletics roll to mitigate damage from falling, your character gains one automatic success. Additionally, add your Parkour rating to the threshold of damage that can be removed through this roll. Parkour will not mitigate damage from a terminal velocity fall.

But the section on falling damage (p97) doesn't say anything about a "threshold of damage that can be removed":

If the character has the opportunity to slow his fall, for example by grabbing an awning, or to soften it, such as by twisting to land on soil rather than concrete, his player may make a Dexterity + Athletics roll, with each success on the roll reducing the damage the character takes by one point. It’s typi­cally not possible to slow or soften a fall at terminal velocity.

So what is it referring to?

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The Parkour Merit is effectively unchanged from when it was written for The God-Machine Chronicle rules update, with the exception that in GMC it explicitly referenced 1e falling rules:

Cat Leap (••): Your character falls with outstanding grace. When using a Dexterity + Athletics roll to mitigate damage from falling (see the World of Darkness Rulebook, p. 179), your character gains one automatic success. Addition­ally, add your Parkour rating to the threshold of damage that can be removed through this roll. Parkour will not mitigate damage from a terminal velocity fall.

On the referenced page in the nWoD 1e core book, it allows there 'may' be a maximum amount of damage mitigated, presumably arbitrarily determined by the ST:

The Storyteller may allow your character to try to break his fall by some means, perhaps by grabbing for aw­nings or twisting to strike soil rather than concrete. A single Dexterity + Athletics roll may be called for, with each success gained diminishing damage taken. There may be a limit to how much damage can be shaved, though — say, three. There’s only so much that desperate flailing and grabbing can do when someone falls from a signifi­cant height. Efforts to slow one’s fall are usually useless at terminal velocity.

That rule letting STs set a maximum amount of successes on the roll just doesn't exist in 2e, so the sentence no longer makes sense, and now the sole benefit of Cat Leap, in RAW, is the single automatic success.

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