8
\$\begingroup\$

I'm exploring Fate Core because of the focus on story and especially the additional aspect of collaborative story creation/telling.

On page 13 of the Fate Core rulebook, it states that the players can spend a Fate Point to declare a story detail. But often this will be happening already as a normal part of play.

What is the metric for when a story detail costs a Fate Point?

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

When the GM feels it's worth it.

...yeah, I realize that doesn't help you too much in the "looking for a metric" sense. But that's really the only authority there is on the matter. Is this story detail sufficiently beneficial to the players that the GM feels it's worth charging them a Fate Point to assert?

Usually, that means "does this get around some obstacle the GM had planned?", like the reference example on page 13 where the party's meeting strange people of unknown allegiance and Zird's just like "wait, doesn't this Aspect mean I can speak their language?"

But there's a few ways a GM can respond to someone bringing up their Aspect in a way they didn't expect. Aspects are all true, remember. Think about where on this spectrum your response is most likely to fall.

  • your Aspect just lets you declare that certain things are true; for example, Zird can probably just recognize the traditional clothing worn by the major cultures of the world when his companions might not
  • your Aspect gives you the standing to roll a skill in a situation where most people wouldn't; for example, when a foreign delegation gives an unusual gift to the king, Zird can roll Lore as a stand-in for Empathy to try and "read the motives" behind it.
  • your Aspect lets you spend a Fate Point to declare some plot detail, bypassing an obstacle
  • your Aspect lets you spend a Fate Point to declare some plot detail, giving you standing to roll a skill; for example, in the situation on page 13 the GM could additionally ask Zird to roll Rapport to establish peaceful contact.
  • sorry, I don't really see how your Aspect actually applies here.
\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Exactly. The relevant text on Page 13 of Fate Core is, "Sometimes, you want to add a detail that works to your character's advantage. [...] To do this, you'll spend a Fate point." \$\endgroup\$ – Beanluc Apr 23 '18 at 21:45
3
\$\begingroup\$

The relevant text on Page 13 of Fate Core is, "Sometimes, you want to add a detail that works to your character's advantage. [...] To do this, you'll spend a Fate point."

I think of it as similar to other spending-a-Fate-point scenarios. It's done in order to instantly affect the course of the fiction, in a way which directly benefits the outcome to the player of a plot point which is immediately (as in, right now) in play and being decided/resolved.

There is one small difference: Keep in mind, too, that whatever the Story Detail is, it remains true forever (unless gameplay changes it). In the Fate Core example, Zird will still be able to communicate with speakers of this particular village's language even if the scene, session or adventure ends and he encounters such people again in a totally different scenario. This can be considered, when deciding whether or not to ask a player how bad they want it.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.