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The following part of the description of Dimensional Shackles seems a bit ambiguous to me :

the shackles prevent a creature bound by them from using any method of extradimensional movement, including teleportation or travel to a different plane of existence.

What gives me pause here is whether the “prevents... teleportation” is to be read as “prevents (only) teleportation to a different plane”, or “prevents (all kinds of) teleportation (, as well as travel to a different plane)”.

Which one is it ?

(I’m asking because a fellow DM said that teleportation would not be blocked if the shackles’ target wishes to teleport within the same plane)

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    \$\begingroup\$ Historical note: In third edition, Dimensional Shackles did definitely prohibit all teleportation spells, as in that edition all teleportation spells explicitly functioned by briefly transporting the target through the astral plane. \$\endgroup\$ – GMJoe Apr 20 '18 at 11:01
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All teleportation

Essentially the main purpose of dimensional shackles is to restrain not just any regular person, but specifically a caster or other creature that is able to teleport. Regular shackles would not effectively hold such a creature, since the creature might just be able to cast misty step or dimension door (both of which only have verbal components) to teleport away from the area and then have someone free them. (It would be especially difficult to hold a sorcerer without such shackles, since their Subtle Spell metamagic allows them to spend a sorcery point to cast a spell without needing the verbal or somatic components.)

In addition, I don't think travel to other planes is generally considered "teleportation". For instance, plane shift uses the word "transported":

You and up to eight willing creatures who link hands in a circle are transported to a different plane of existence.

And blink uses the terms "appear", "vanish", and "return":

you vanish from your current plane of existence and appear in the Ethereal Plane [...] you return to an unoccupied space

As such, the intended interpretation seems likely to be that it blocks all teleportation, and also blocks travel to a different plane of existence; both of these are ostensibly considered "method[s] of extradimensional movement". The one exception specified in the description of the dimensional shackles is:

They don't prevent the creature from passing through an interdimensional portal.

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    \$\begingroup\$ The teleport spell uses the same wording as Plane Shift, "This spell instantly transports you and up to eight willing creatures o f your choice that you can see within range.", so it might be considered "teleportation", no? \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint Apr 20 '18 at 1:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hmm. Fair point. Still, the rest of my answer applies. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Apr 20 '18 at 2:48
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While I agree with V2Blast that the purpose of the item seems to be not letting people just Misty Step away, the RAW is very confusing about defining what exactly extradimensional movement should mean. Personally, I wouldn't call teleporting from one place in a dimension to another in the same dimension extradimensional.

Some Spell entries in the PHB seem to indicate that teleportation is not an extradimensional mean (to move), thus not an extradimensional movement. For example, the Spell Hallow:

Extradimensional Interference. Affected creatures can’t move or travel using teleportation or by extradimensional or interplanar means.

The awkward thing is that Teleport (the spell) can't be used to other plane anyway, so it wouldn't make much sense even mentioning it if the purpose was to only restrain people from teleporting to another dimension, unless effect of spells like Plane Shift are indeed considered teleportations, which I consider possible as the wording is very similar:

Plane Shift: You and up to eight willing creatures who link hands in a circle are transported to a different plane of existence.

Teleport: This spell instantly transports you and up to eight willing creatures of your choice that you can see within range, or a single object that you can see within range, to a destination you select.

Also, Plane Shift can be used with Teleportation Circles, so it might be considered a teleportation method.

Anyway, the RAW is unclear on defining these terms, there is nothing on Sage Advice to make it clearer, so...

Up to the DM.

But, unlike Spells, Magic Items usually serve a specific purpose in the game. You, as DM, are usually using them for a purpose or giving them to the players so they can do something. Just make sure the item serves that purpose. I would think that magic items are one of the least important things to follow by rule. Unless you are rolling the treasures and end up giving them this item. Anyway, I don't think allowing or restricting teleportation with the shackles is a matter of balancing, so you can choose what is better for the plot and fun.

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This is essentially a parsing issue.

If you read it like this:

the shackles prevent a creature bound by them from using any method of extradimensional movement, including teleportation to a different plane of existence or travel to a different plane of existence.

Then no, not all teleportation is blocked. Only extradimensional and extra planer are blocked.

But if you read it like this:

the shackles prevent a creature bound by them from using any method of extradimensional movement, including teleportation, also including travel to a different plane of existence.

Then yes, all teleportation, of any kind, whatever you define that to be, is explicitly blocked.

The problem is the English used here can be parsed either way.

If all you want is a RAW answer then we have to stop here and shrug.

A reasonable argument could be made that they're called "dimensional" shackles for a reason. That not every form of teleportation must involve extra dimensions or planes of existence.

Whether that makes sense depends entirely on if you choose to concern yourself with the mechanics of how the magic works or only the effect it produces. If I say "Hey look over there" and hop from one spot to another have I teleported?

A classic example to show the importance of understanding the mechanics behind an effect, rather then just the effect, is invisibility.

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