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The stats for an ochre jelly don't mention resistance to fire damage (which I'd assume given they're wet and slimy).

So does fire do full damage? Or does it get resistance?

Note, in Baldurs Gate it swings the other way; i.e., it's vulnerable to fire damage. http://baldursgate.wikia.com/wiki/Ochre_Jelly

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    \$\begingroup\$ The Baldur's Gate games are based on 2e AD&D rules and so aren't relevant to 5e D&D. FWIW, in that context "is vulnerable to" means "takes normal damage from" rather than "takes additional damage from". \$\endgroup\$
    – Carcer
    Commented Jul 8, 2018 at 14:54

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You essentially answered your own question. The stats for ochre jelly don't mention resistance to fire damage, therefore it isn't resistant. Under resistances it only lists being resistant to acid.

Of course, your DM isn't required to abide by the stat block, they can choose to customize a monster as they will. But as written, an ochre jelly is not resistant to fire.

The Baldur's Gate reference that you cite isn't D&D 5th Edition.

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No, they don't get resistance to fire damage. If you're looking for a way to justify it despite the "wet and slimy", whatever acidic mucus covers them is just flammable enough, or doesn't offer good thermal protection.

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