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The 17th level rogue encounter power Path of the Blade (from Dragon 381) states the following:

Effect: You can shift a number of squares equal to 2 + your Charisma modifier. Two times during this shift, you can make an attack, each time against a different enemy adjacent to you.

In Han Shot First: A Scoundrel's Guide, it says that you get 4 attacks total.

According to the original wording, is this accurate? My group is wondering whether you get a max of 2 or 4 attacks.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ hi, well the source material is an article in Dragon 381 entitled Class Acts, the Duelist Rogue, by Mike Mearls. The rogue guide: enworld.org/forum/… I guess our query relates to the orginal wording in the source material, ( i.e two times you can make an attack, each time against a different enemy); \$\endgroup\$ – Louarn Aug 2 '18 at 14:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ From the guide: "A shift, and two attacks that slide at any two points during the shift (so you get 4 attacks total)." The wording here makes me think they're referring to some combo to get an additional attack (possibly for another player) out of the slide, not that the power inherently gives four attacks. \$\endgroup\$ – Oblivious Sage Aug 2 '18 at 14:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ ok that now makes sense, thanks. Wondering, however, what combo that could be, since sliding an enemy can't provoque an aoo... \$\endgroup\$ – Louarn Aug 2 '18 at 14:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Louarn I think you may have found a mistake in the 4e compendium (which the guide might be based on) where it looks like they (accidentally?) increased the power by changing a few words compared to how it appears in its original printing. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Brown Aug 2 '18 at 14:58
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Path of the Blade allows up to two attacks if you go by Dragon 381.

Both Dragon and Dungeon are official magazines. You don't have to use their content, but they are condoned by WotC. The guide that you posted is not official in anyway and should be read keeping that in mind.

The Path of Blade attack power can be found in Dragon 381 on page 69.

Effect: You can shift a number of squares equal to 2 + your Charisma modifier. Two times during this shift, you can make an attack, each time against a different enemy adjacent to you.

It calls out the 2 attacks within the power as a primary attack and a secondary attack (against a different target than the primary target).


Path of the Blade allows up to four attacks if you go by the 4e compendium!

This power is not reproduced exactly in the 4e compendium! Perhaps your guide was referencing the power as written in the compendium.

Effect: You can shift a number of squares equal to 2 + your Charisma modifier. Two times during this shift, you can use the Path of the Blade Attack power, each time against a different enemy adjacent to you.

The attack power in the compendium has a primary and a secondary target (so up to 2 attacks each time you use this power). It is unclear whether there was intent to change the description when it was added to the compendium. I suspect this was a mistake, but your table will have to decide which versions of official resources to use.


I asked about Dragon & Dungeon vs the Compendium as a followup.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Excellent, looking forward for the follow up consensus.Thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – Louarn Aug 2 '18 at 15:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's not so much a mistake as a confusion- you're interpreting "you can make an attack" to mean the primary as attack 1 and the secondary as attack 2, whereas the people coding the Compendium presumably read it as "you can make an attack (which includes a secondary attack) and then you can make another attack (which also includes a secondary attack)." \$\endgroup\$ – JLan Aug 3 '18 at 2:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Agreed. I am definitely interpreting the 2 attacks in the original source as individual attacks. I am interpreting the reason that the original source has a primary attack and a secondary attack as their attempt to clarify that there are up to 2 attacks against different targets. Clearly, it is not so clear after all, huh? \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Brown Aug 3 '18 at 13:58

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