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Several spells and powers, e.g. Dinosaur Form, give you:

natural melee attacks, which are the only types of attacks you can use.

Items such as the Handwraps of Mighty Fists:

give your unarmed attacks the benefits of [runes placed on them], making your unarmed attacks work like magic weapons.

What I cannot find anywhere in the book is whether natural attacks are unarmed strikes. On the one hand, they weren't in Pathfinder 1st; on the other, if they're not here then the damage output of a dinosaur seems a lot worse than that of someone with a magic sword.

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No (at least, not in general)

Pathfinder 2nd Edition is very explicit about using traits to define whether something is or is not another thing. Anything which refers to an "Unarmed Attack" is referring to an attack (i.e. something with the Attack trait) which has the Unarmed trait. Attacks being natural does not include any extra traits (in fact, Natural isn't even a game term, and its inclusion could be completely removed with no effect).


Of note though, many of these spells are on-par or close to for the level of spell they are. Additionally, they include the ability to heighten them to higher levels, which appears to normally vastly increase the damage dice of them.

The spells also set your statistics, so even a Sorcerer with 10 Strength and 10 Dexterity could have a much higher AC/damage bonus than their stats would normally allow, which makes these polymorph spells useful in many cases.

Taking the Dinosaur Form example, it can be heightened to just 1 level higher, doubling the damage - this gives a 10th level caster the ability to give themself a +16 attack which deals 4d8+6 damage; which is roughly equivalent to a +4 longsword wielded by a similar-leveled Fighter with 18 Strength.

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