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enter image description here Whirling Throw Feat 6

Requirements You have a creature grabbed or restrained.


You propel your grabbed or restrained foe a great distance. Choose a distance in feet of up to 10 + 5 × your Strength modifier that you want to throw the creature. Attempt an Athletics check with a DC of 5 plus the total distance in feet you’re trying to throw the creature. You take a –2 circumstance penalty to your check for every size the target is larger than you or a +2 circumstance bonus to your check for every size the target is smaller than you.

If you throw the creature, it takes bludgeoning damage equal to your Strength modifier plus 1d6 per 10 feet you threw it.

Success You throw the creature up to 10 feet.

Critical Success You throw the creature the desired distance.

Failure You don’t throw the creature.

Critical Failure You don’t throw the creature, and it’s no longer grabbed or restrained by you.

It seems to me that not only do you increase the DC of the check when you try to throw a creature farther, even if you succeed on the check it only throws it 10 feet instead of the increased distance.

Is this really the correct reading?

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Yes, you're reading correctly.

As written, you increase the DC of the throw by trying to throw them further, but a plain success only ever throws them 10'.

So a thrower with 14 Strength could attempt to throw a creature up to 20' (10 + 2*5). Attempting to throw 10' would be an Athletics Check with a DC of 15, where success and critical success would both result in the same conclusion, a creature thrown 10'. Attempting to throw them 20' would be an Athletics Check with a DC of 25, however, where success throws them 10' and critical success throws them 20'.

I'd however note that you get to add your level to your proficiency, so if you're Trained in Athletics, a 10th level Monk would have a +10 to the Athletics roll plus their Strength modifier (more if Expert/Master). So at higher levels you can often throw foes further than you previously could, even if your Strength or proficiency rank don't continue scaling.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Darn, I was hoping I was reading it wrong. \$\endgroup\$ – william porter Aug 14 '18 at 20:35
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Yes, you are correct

This is one of the few abilities that have a fixed DC when used against an enemy, instead of using a level-based difficulty or one of the target's saving throws as suggested by the GM chapter. So I suspect that there is a chance this may change before the final version of the rules.

As such, it will scale very nicely, and soon you will be throwing at a minimum of 10 ft even if you roll 2 on the dice. I would just like to point out that a 10th level monk is probably throwing a target at 15 ft minimum by then (10 from proficiency, +4 or +5 from str, +2 from master), and throwing 20 ft without difficulty (7-8 on d20). This isn't a bad feat at all.

Note that the damage is not the greatest potential of this ability, but throwing enemies on hazardous locations, such as pits, traps, spell areas, forest fires and similar. Moving them into position for allies to catch them on effects is also a pretty good choice considering that this ability only uses two actions (grapple and throw). Forced movements like this have been a no-no on first edition, and usually were followed by a phrase clarifying that the target was allowed a second saving throw to avoid the new danger.

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