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The Peryton (from the Monster Manual) is normally a medium-sized creature.

If it's summoned by find greater steed does it reshape and become large, or stay medium size?

I am not sure due to this part of the wording.

Your summon a steed that takes on a form that you choose: griffon, pegasus, peryton, dire wolf, rhinoceros, or saber-toothed tiger. The steed has the statistics of the chosen form

Would the Peryton get all of the rules it normally has like the dive attack rules, the resistances, etc?.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Is your paladin a gnome, a halfling, a goblin, a kobold, or another small sized creature? \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Sep 2 '18 at 14:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ Human, I suspect it would change because it states "you summon a steed" Steed alone means its meant to be rideable, I felt like if they there was meant to be exceptions they would have stated that only small creatures can ride this. Kinda like how fireball states things cannot be on fire if they are worn or carried. \$\endgroup\$ – Seig Soloyvov Sep 2 '18 at 21:50
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You quote this bit:

Your summon a steed that takes on a form that you choose: griffon, pegasus, peryton, dire wolf, rhinoceros, or saber-toothed tiger. The steed has the statistics of the chosen form

and by that, the answer is very straightforward. Size is one of the statistics of a monster. In fact, it's the first listed in the "Statistics" section in the intro to the Monster Manual. Since the peryton has a size statistic of medium in its description, that's the size of the summoned steed when you choose that form.

Note that non-greater, regular Find Steed also has medium-sized options (pony and mastiff). Presumably these sizes are there to support small-sized paladins (gnomes, halflings, etc.).

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    \$\begingroup\$ Although there's another funny possible interpretation, because the lesser spell says: Your steed serves you as a mount, both in combat and out. One could take this as an exception to the general rule a willing creature that is at least one size larger than you and that has an appropriate anatomy can serve as a mount, leading to the possibility of a goliath riding on a pony. \$\endgroup\$ – mattdm Sep 2 '18 at 19:55
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There is nothing in the spell that suggests that the mount resizes, and it specifically says the mount gets the features described in the peryton's description. Furthermore, whatever the peryton's description says should apply to the summoned mount.

You might want to have a discussion with your GM about how this will work in your specific game.

Regarding re-sizing, while that might make *some** sense, that's not what the spell says. There's a fundamental rule in D&D that spells do only what they say they do.

You can decide it seems reasonable to you that the peryton would be large, and maybe that makes sense to you. Depending on your GM, it might or might not be true. The rules don't provide an answer other than a peryton is medium. A great way to find out is to discuss it with your GM and then try it. To me, the rules say it's medium, then it's medium. A fundamental rule in D&D is that the GM describes the environment, the players describe what they want to do, the GM describes the results of their actions. So try it. Another fundamental rule is "rulings, not rules". The rules explicitly say the GM can interpret, change, or ignore the rules as he or she sees fit.

Good luck with that peryton. Have you read that description? Scary beastie.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I see, I was thinking because it's a magical summon and the purpose of the spell is to ride the mount would grow or shrink depending on the summoner. \$\endgroup\$ – Seig Soloyvov Sep 2 '18 at 13:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ That's not an unreasonable thought. Depending on your GM, that might or might not be true. The rules don't provide an answer. A great way to find out is to discuss it with your GM and then try it. A fundamental rule in D&D is that the GM describes the environment, the players describe what they want to do, the GM describes the results of their actions. Another fundamental rule is "rulings, not rules". The rules explicitly say the GM can interpret, change, or ignore the rules as he or she sees fit. Good luck with that peryton. Have you read that description? Scary beastie. \$\endgroup\$ – Jack Sep 2 '18 at 13:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ In this case, I think it actually goes beyond that, because the spell actually does say what it does w.r.t. the statistics of the summoned creature. \$\endgroup\$ – mattdm Sep 2 '18 at 20:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ "There's a fundamental rule in D&D that spells do only what they say they do." No, there isn't, and let's not keep propagating this misconception. I don't think that affects the rest of your answer, though. \$\endgroup\$ – Mark Wells Sep 2 '18 at 20:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ Jeremy Crawford: "A spell's text details the spell's effects—the only thing the spell does. Any additional effects are up to the DM". (rpg.stackexchange.com/questions/107637/…) \$\endgroup\$ – Jack Sep 2 '18 at 22:16

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