4
\$\begingroup\$

In D&D 3.5e, size modifiers are as follows:

  • Fine: +8
  • Diminutive: +4
  • Tiny: +2
  • Small: +1
  • Medium: 0
  • Large: –1
  • Huge: –2
  • Gargantuan: –4
  • Colossal: –8

These size modifiers are applied to a creature's attack bonus and AC.

Are these size modifiers relative to a Medium creature? For example, if a Tiny creature attacks a Tiny creature, do they both get a +2 bonus to their AC? It makes sense that a Medium creature would have a harder time hitting a Tiny creature, but I don't know why a Tiny creature would have a harder time hitting another Tiny creature than a Colossal creature would have hitting another Colossal creature.

\$\endgroup\$
10
\$\begingroup\$

The modifiers are static, and make attacks relative to each other appropriately adjusted for the situation. The equation bakes the advantage / disadvantage of size modifiers into base stats, and makes no impact on two creatures of the same size fighting each other.

These size modifiers are applied to a creature's attack bonus and AC.

Using the idea of equivalent equation, the size modifiers automatically take relative sizes into account.

For example - two tiny creatures duking it out are effectively at +0 size modifier against each other. +2 Hit, +2 AC VS +2 Hit +2 AC = total of zero modifier relative to each other. So they are on equal footing size wise.

A Colossal creature Vs a tiny creature

+2 Hit, +2 AC VS -8 Hit, -8 AC = +10 modifier in favor of the tiny creature. No need to re-apply the bonuses a second time.

A colossal creature VS a Colossal Creature

-8 hit, -8 AC VS -8 hit, -8 AC = total of zero modifier in relationship to each other.

A Gargantuan Creature fighting a tiny creature would be at a total + 6 modifier, and a Gargantuan creature fighting a medium creature would deal with a +4 modifier.

So it scales and auto scales. The math is already worked into the base stats of the creature to prevent excessive calculations during combat.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.