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I was looking through a necromancer class for pathfinder published by a third party source and I noticed a section that claims "At 3rd level, a necromancer gains Command Undead as a bonus feat." I was primarily wondering if this was possible, for a spell to function as a feat. If it is possible, how exactly does it work?

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Spells and Feats are separate things

A spell can't be a feat, and a feat can't be a spell. When the class feature Command Undead states you gain Command Undead as a bonus feat, it must be talking about the feat Command Undead, not the spell Command Undead.

Yes, there are 3 different things all called Command Undead. Context is required to know which is referred to. Since the class feature says you gain it as a bonus feat, it can only be referring to the feat of the same name.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @GreySage I think it would be nice to note that there are feats that grant specific spells as supernatural or spell-like abilities, usually with some other cost or restriction associated. The feat Channeled Revival is a good example of this. \$\endgroup\$
    – T. Sar
    Oct 16, 2018 at 11:00
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No, Spells cannot function as feats (in general)

Specifically on Command Undead, there is both a Command Undead Feat, as well as a Command Undead Spell; which can cause confusion.

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The issue with this is that there is actually both a spell and feat with the exact same name. So in this case the class is actually granting you a feat.

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You are mixing the feat with the spell of same name

Pathfinder has a feat called Command Undead, and also a spell called Command Undead. Sometimes they get mixed up, but the context should be enough to clarify which one the text is talking about. Here, it says:

At 3rd level, a necromancer gains Command Undead as a bonus feat.

So, it's clear it is talking about the feat, Command Undead.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you mean 'Command' instead of 'Control'? \$\endgroup\$ Oct 16, 2018 at 12:47

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