Okay, so I'm playing in a D&D 3.X/Pathfinder game, everything in print available.

Some of the players are wanting to 'convert/combine' multiple lower level spell slots into a higher level spell slot (they're wanting to combine say 2 1st level to make a 2nd level spell slot, or 2 2nd level slots to make a 3rd spell slot available...

I know you can cast a lower level spell with a higher level spell slot (even not using metamagic feats), but could, say a sorcerer, that's out of higher level spells, 'combine' a number of spell slots from lower levels to cast a 'higher' level spell?

We're assuming that the character can already cast the higher level spells...

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is exactly the benefit of the Versatile Spellcaster feat from Races of the Dragon. If your players want to get it for free, you can certainly make a houserule that allows it, but as far as the rules are concerned, they have to take the feat to do it.

  • @ShadowKras Well, linking the feat would require linking to an illegal website, and providing the exact text, thereby allowing anyone to use the feat without owning the books, would violate Fair Use. – Miniman Oct 16 at 11:43
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    Quoting just the feat's benefit—without its prerequisites—should be okay (like here). Alternatively, putting the feat's benefit into your own words would work. Both workarounds mean that those interested in the feat must still acquire the original text. (And, I would argue, what the asker's players wanted isn't exactly the benefit of the feat Versatile Spellcaster… but, yeah, it is awfully close.) – Hey I Can Chan Oct 16 at 12:44

From 3.5 there are also the varient rules for spell points from unearthed arcana. Basically what happens is that instead of spell slots you instead get spell points, you then prepare (or cast if sponstatinous) into the spells you want. Sure you could have nothing but 5th level spells, but you would burn out really quickly. Or you could have nearly unlimited weak low level spells.

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