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If someone makes a pact with a magical entity, does it have to be warlock abilities, or can it be something more traditional — wealth, political influence, or something simple like killing someone they dislike? The deal with the devil stereotype.

I just find it kinda weird that a powerful being like a devil or outsider would only grant a fixed set of things. It seems kinda restricting for someone who lives by making deals. More deals means more power so if you could pick up a beggar who feels disatisfied with his lot in life and asks for "wealth and power" that would be a pretty good and easy deal which would require little to no effort.

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A warlock’s pact is a special, specific, long-term deal with their patron.

Anything with intelligence (in the general sense) can make a deal with anyone else of intelligence on any terms within their respective power.

Wealth and power in return for your immortal soul? Sign here, initial there, see you in the afterlife. Have a nice day

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    \$\begingroup\$ You might also want to clarify that such deals (besides a warlock-patron relationship) aren't generally something covered in the rules - as far as I know - so it's basically up to the DM to decide how such a deal would work. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Nov 4 '18 at 0:51
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Although any kind of social contract between characters in the game are within the ability of the DM to create or enforce, there are no rules to handle such things in character creation beyond those in the Player's Handbook. A DM is perfectly within their rights to set up a situation in which a random beggar has sold his soul to a devil for worldly power there are several things to keep in mind:

  1. Player Characters are fairly bound by a system of rules to ensure a good play experience. They are granted certain powers and restrictions based on class choice, race choice and various build options. To throw in an uncontrolled element such as a devil suddenly granting extra powers in return for something the player is unlikely to pay for risks that play experience. How many characters who have lost their soul go on to play eternal torment? Most likely they roll up a fresh character. There is no real incentive not to make such a deal, as there are no real consequences.

  2. In-game, the soul of a beggar is a poor commodity. Since they would be so easily bought as you suggest, it is highly likely that they are of little value to devils and other extraplanar powers. Supply and demand would indicate that the high number of beggars would mean that devils would not need to offer much in return for a soul. The earthly rewards of such a bargain would rarely make its presence felt in the world of high power that is that of a typical D&D adventurer.

  3. That being said, there is nothing stopping you from making this the plot point of a specific adventure. It would be better run as a central campaign event rather than a general character building feature.

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Sure, there are many kinds of bargain a mortal can strike with a powerful being for many different costs. The Warlock represents a particular kind of close relationship; a Warlock is their patron's hand in the world, rather than the result of a single exchange.

That is to say, while you might trade your soul to a devil for temporal power, a fiend-pact Warlock is doing much more than that; they're required to do things to increase their patron's influence in the world.

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