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The spell Miracle has a specific example of a request that reads as follows:

Moving you and your allies, with all your and their gear, from one plane to a specific locale through planar barriers with no chance of error.

The question then becomes, since planar barriers aren't an explicitly defined term, can Dimensional Lock/Antimagic Field be considered barriers that are ignored by your miracle? Specifically regarding Antimagic Field, Miracle isn't truly a spell:

You don’t so much cast a miracle as request one. You state what you would like to have happen and request that your deity (or the power you pray to for spells) intercede.

Can Miracle be used to escape these dangerous zones?

Edit:

My questions regarding antimagic field focus on this qualifier within the spell text:

Artifacts and deities are unaffected by mortal magic such as this.

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    \$\begingroup\$ As a spell imported from D&D 3.5, more information on miracle should be available in that game, but a quick search of that game's Player's Handbook, Dungeon Master's Guide, Manual of the Planes, and the Planar Handbook yielded no results for planar barrier. Weird. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Nov 27 '18 at 18:58
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If the cleric uses Miracle to duplicate a spell, it is blocked by all the things that block that spell.

Without spending additional material components...

You state what you would like to have happen and request that your deity (or the power you pray to for spells) intercede.

A miracle can do any of the following things.

  • Duplicate any cleric spell of 8th level or lower.
  • Duplicate any other spell of 7th level or lower.
  • Undo the harmful effects of certain spells, such as feeblemind or insanity.
  • Have any effect whose power level is in line with the above effects.

When a uses Miracle to duplicates the effect of a spell with Miracle, her deity is not casting the spell on her behalf. Instead, her deity is using their power to create an effect that is exactly equal to the spell as if the cleric had cast it herself, except as otherwise stated in Miracle's text. (Note that the save DCs for the spell are affected by the cleric's spellcasting stat, feats, and items, and not by her Deity's!)

As such, a spell that is duplicated is subject to all of the same limitations as the original would be. Similarly, teleporting into a Dimensional Lock or Anti-Magic Field would not be "in line with" the other elements on that list, since it is expressly more powerful than Plane Shift or Greater Teleport.

If the cleric use Miracle with an expensive component, Dimensional Lock and Anti-Magic Field are (at least partially) effective

Dimensional Lock reads:

Once dimensional lock is in place, extradimensional travel into or out of the area is not possible.

There is no exception in the description of Dimensional Lock for divine beings. Even a Deity would be unable to move you through a Dimensional Lock.

Anti-Magic Field, as pointed out in the question, makes exceptions for Artifacts and Deities.

Artifacts and deities are unaffected

Therefore, if the cleric is requesting a Miracle from a Deity (and not from a non-deific entity that grants cleric spells, such as an Alignment), that Deity may ignore the anti-magic field when granting their request.

It doesn't matter, though, because the Miracle can negate the offending effect

The second effect of Miracle is unbounded as written. The examples given in the spell are just that - examples. At your DM's discretion, the entity that grants the cleric's spells, regardless of whether it is a deity or not, could simply end or suppress the Dimensional Lock/Anti-Magic Field, before depositing the cleric and her party at their destination.

In either case, Miracle cannot be cast if the cleric is already inside an Anti-Magic Field.

Miracle is a spell, and Anti-Magic Field.

prevents the functioning of any spells within its confines.

Thus, the Miracle spell would never take effect, and the deity would be unable to use the spell's effect to intercede. (But, depending on campaign/setting, might still be able to intervene of their own accord if they are inclined to help)

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Despite the descriptive text in the spell description, the Miracle spell also states

A duplicated spell allows saving throws and spell resistance as normal, but the save DCs are as for a 9th-level spell.

This tends to indicate the effect is still mechanically a spell (presumably, from a fluff perspective, the deity is still using magic to produce the effect, however powereful that magic might be), and would still be affected by anything that would affect a spell. As such, while I would expect Miracle to be able to overcome a Dimensional Lock, it should not be able to overcome an Antimagic Field. So, if the destination is inside an Antimagic Field, the Miracle will likely deposit the transportees just outside that field. If the start location is inside an Antimagic field, then I would not expect the spell to function at all.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm not sure this qualifies. Sure, it may be a "spell" in this circumstance (though the section you outline is highly specific and only very weakly related to the issue the Question asks), however, the spell's text states it is still a Deity performing the spell that is duplicated, meaning that it would be "unaffected by mortal magic such as this." However, I agree that the spell Miracle itself could not be cast from within an Antimagic Field, since Miracle is cast by the Cleric, while everything else is up to the Deity. \$\endgroup\$ – SeraphsWrath Nov 28 '18 at 4:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ There's nothing else in the spell description to indicate it works any better, or more powerfully than any other spell of similar level, or even that there is a higher caster level, or any other magical rules are allowed to be broken. Perfect power channeled through an imperfect vessel. \$\endgroup\$ – YogoZuno Nov 28 '18 at 5:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ It never states that the caster "channels" the deity, only that: "request that your deity (or the power you pray to for spells) intercede." Thus, it is clear that the deity is the one performing the magic, and nowhere does it say that the cleric "channels the deity." \$\endgroup\$ – SeraphsWrath Nov 28 '18 at 5:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Saying something is clear does not make it so. The fact that spell effects inherit the spellcasting capabilities of the caster do indicate that the caster is in some way affecting the deific output. Note that nowhere in the spell description are any guidelines given for determining the deity's power, either. How do we know what any given deity is capable of, or just how powerful their effects are? If they were important to the outcome, I would expect those to be there, or at least alluded to. \$\endgroup\$ – YogoZuno Nov 28 '18 at 5:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, we're probably about to be told not to debate things in comments. Feel free to move this discussion elsewhere, or to your own question. \$\endgroup\$ – YogoZuno Nov 28 '18 at 5:11
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First line of text in spell description states:

"You don’t so much cast a miracle as request one."

The only possible conclusion You can draw from that is that the desired effect is NOT a spell.

Miracle will only be considered a spell if it duplicates a spell effect (and indeed there is a line stating that "A duplicated spell allows saving throws and spell resistance as normal, but the save DCs are as for a 9th-level spell.", which in Your case it is not. Transporting through dimensions is under "very powerful request" section and NOT under spell duplication sections.

So to answer properly and clearly: unless we consider person who cast dimensional lock and antimagic field to be a god (or of godlike power, which in terms of D&D 3.5 would translate to lvl. 40+), Miracle should easily transport You and Your allies safely, while completely ignoring dimensional lock and antimagic field effects.

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In the context of moving, probably Yes

The spell Miracle states:

You state what you would like to have happen and request that your deity (or the power you pray to for spells) intercede.

This phrasing alone suggests that the Deity is the one performing magic in this case, because the cleric requests an effect and the Deity "intercedes", which means the Deity is the one who performs any action after that part.

This relates to the relevant text of Antimagic Field:

Artifacts and deities are unaffected by mortal magic such as this.

Furthermore, moving "you and your allies" is not a "duplicated spell," it is a "very powerful request." It is not a duplicated spell of any kind, and is thus not subjected to the rules for duplicated spells.

Alternatively, a cleric can make a very powerful request... Examples of especially powerful miracles of this sort could include the following:

...

  • Moving you and your allies, with all your and their gear, from one plane to a specific locale through planar barriers with no chance of error.

The phrase "Alternatively" clearly separates this portion of text from the above section about duplicating spells (it is also important to note that duplicating spells is only two options of that section).

Also, as far as I can find, there is no such thing as a "Planar Barrier" spell, which would mean that the text "through planar barriers" refers to constructs such as Dimensional Lock that would impede movement through planes.

And even further, there is the text:

In any event, a request that is out of line with the deity’s (or alignment’s) nature is refused.

Which once again suggests that the Deity is the one performing the request as opposed to the caster.


But Miracle is not without its limits:

While the miracle performed is pretty-definitely on-part of the deity, the overall spell must still be cast to elicit the effect in the first place. Thus, any effect that blocked magic, such as Antimagic Field, would still prevent the spell if the player attempted to cast the spell from within the confines of the AMF.

And as for whether Miracle's saving-throw rules for duplicated spells mean that that particular effect is vulnerable to cancellation by AMF is a GM's call.

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