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The Damaging Modifier on the Move Object Power (page 119) states:

Damaging: Your effect can inflict damage, like an application of normal Strength with damage equal to its rank This includes damaging targets in grabs and making ranged “strike” attacks.

The text there would imply that Move Object is capable of "Grabbing" a target:

This includes damaging targets in grabs

In addition, the DCA version of the Hero Handbook has six examples of Move Object being used to move and grab people, with Wonder Woman's Lasso of Truth being most prominent.

The Fast Grab Advantage (page 84) states:

When you hit with an unarmed attack you can immediately make a grab check against that opponent as a free action (see Grab, page 196). Your unarmed attack inflicts its normal damage and counts as the initial attack check required to grab your opponent.

So the question is:

Does a Ranged, telekinetic version of an unarmed strike count as an Unarmed Strike for the purposes of Fast Grab?

And would this be any different from using Fast Grab on a Close Attack which required an actual Unarmed Strike?

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It's a matter of GM Purview

The rules only allow Fast Grab on unarmed attacks. So, from one point of view, yes, Move Object cannot be used with Fast Grab.

But you can houserule it or use the Extra from Gadget Guides

A couple of weapons in the Gadgets Guide included the Grabbing modifier that allowed them to do Fast Grab. You could similarly introduce something that lets you do that with Damaging Move Object (side note, they use "Grabbing" inconsistently in the examples with the description being that it adds Fast Grab, but being used in the table as "can grab for this many ranks")

Or think about it a different way

Another point of view is that Move Object is "Strength (Extra: Increased Range; F: Grappling only)" with Damaging essentially removing that Flaw, which makes it eligible again for Fast Grab.

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