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The 5th Edition Dungeon Master's Guide describes the Feywild as "an alternate dimension that occupies the same cosmological space" parallel to the "Material Plane". Typically, the Feywild is described as the mirror image of a surface of a planet, for example Toril. But the Material Plane contains more than just the planetary surface: there is also the moon of Selune, other planetary bodies, and the vacuum of realmspace that surrounds them.

Is there any canonical information on what the Feywild mirror image of space is like?

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From the description of the Feywild in the DMG (p. 49):

The sky is alight with the faded colors of an ever-setting sun, which never truly sets (or rises for that matter); it remains stationary, dusky and low in the sky.

Because the sun never sets and is always in the sky, you wouldn't be able to see anything besides it. There isn't much information about the Feywild in 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons, so maybe someone who knows more about older editions can give you a more elaborate answer.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Unfortunately, the Feywild was only introduced in 4e, so nothing before that will have any information on it, and 4e completely changed the cosmology (which 5e partially reverted), so using 4e information will be difficult. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Dec 23 '18 at 21:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ This seems to be talking about what space looks like from the ground in the Feywild. However, the question is about what space looks like when you’re already in “outer space” in the Feywild. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Dec 24 '18 at 0:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ It bugs me that you don't get the moon and stars in the Feywild. It loses all that nightime fey imagery and gains nothing special for it. \$\endgroup\$ – user47897 Dec 24 '18 at 21:33

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