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Question : How does the Death Move Angel of Wrath from the Templar Playbook from Grim World supplement for Dungeon World interact with PvP attitude among the players ? Does the Templar still has HP ? Can she be stopped ?

Specifically : the Templar hates to the guts the Namer PC ( Namer Playbook from Funhaver Games Playbooks, with a bit of modification detailed after) and a Cursed Knight PC ( own creation more or less based on a twisted paladin ). Because of this on the one hand and of her fanatical behavior on the other hand, the Templar is at high risk of death but might want to bring those 2 players with her in death through this death move.

My problem : I’m the GM and I don’t know how to deal with the PvP scene which will come and specifically if the other PCs can do something to avoid this automatic death. The Templar player seems OK to die, but the other 2 really want to survive.

Social agreement : Dark fantasy campaign in a created-on-the-fly polytheist universe, with PvP attitude allowed. The PCs are supposed to be Heroes of the Prophecy in saving the World, wich doesn’t want to be saved. The dysfunctional group of PC is part of the agreement.

Players from a RPG club : they know each others but aren’t exactly close friends.

Move explanation :

Templar Death Move:

Angel of Wrath

Let the cleansing fires consume the vile and unworthy. Let them know my wrath.

When you die, your eyes boil and burn away as holy light pours out of you. Every inch of you radiates hallowed flame. You wield the sword of vengeance, the shield of righteousness, and your gaze pierces the souls of all you look upon. The ground you touch is forever consecrated. Until your wrath is delivered to those deserving nearby, you succeed at every roll and deal max damage.

The GM will soon tell you your work here is done. Embrace serenity, Templar, you have left this putrid world one step closer to absolution.

Namer death Move :

The unnameable

In your final moments, you speak aloud the name of something that should not be named: Life, Death, a God, or a concept, like Time or Gravity. In speaking this true name, you alter some of your target’s nature. When you die, tell us what you’re naming, and what you’re changing about it - this change takes place immediately and suddenly, and is a permanent change. (this could be applied to the goddess of the Templar I think )

Speak True Name modification relevant to the problem : add to the list : – The move’s target gives you a important information, change the environment or help you dealing with a problem

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Tell them the requirements or consequences and then ask.

Ultimately, the Templar burns out when the GM says they do. If they're only pointed at the GM's side, it's easy enough to not care about a single limited-time sovereign opponent, but dealing with one pointed at the other players is a bit more difficult. Of course, the Templar is going to grievously wound whatever they're pointed at when they get the spotlight, but they don't always have the spotlight, even now. Surely fleeing for your life from an unstoppable burning force is worth some spotlight?

I'm assuming the other PCs will be alright with the chance to run. Before you start this whole rigmarole you should get their buy-in. But if they're alright with having a chance, you can present the state of affairs to the Templar as something like:

Your time in the core of vengeance is limited. (Draw a "clock" of an eight-segmented circle or otherwise provide a visible countdown.) If you want to murder the others, you can try, and you'll probably succeed eventually, but they can run or throw up barriers in your way that will take some of this time. And of course, if you drop one of them, they'll make their own sovereign mark on the world which can snuff you out right then.

Don't you have anything better to do?

But this is dark fantasy. Maybe they don't.

So, go around the table like you usually would. Try and be fair with turns. People can't stop the Templar, or fight them, but they can run and create barriers with all the power available to them. I can't speak to your PCs' total bag of tricks, but in general as long as they're focused on running or throwing barriers in the Templar's way, a 10+ success will buy them one clock segment of the Templar smashing down barriers or in hot pursuit. A 7-9 success will get them hit but still burn one clock segment. If they act together to block the path or find an escape, two 10+s will slow the Templar by 2 clock segments; otherwise two successes will slow the Templar by 1 clock segment, with the option to burn a second one to catch up and do damage.

If your other PCs do die in the process, their own death moves will do at least 3 clock segments to the Templar's vengeance countdown in addition to their other lingering effects. To determine if they can snuff the Templar out entirely -- well, this is one death move coming up against another, the outcome is in doubt. So roll - the PC who just died using an appropriate stat, probably +Int for the Namer or +Con for the Cursed Knight, aided by the sole survivor, interfered by the Templar. A 7-9 takes off all but one clock segment, if the Templar was at more than 4; otherwise or on a 10+ the Templar is snuffed entirely.

If the other PCs aren't okay with this level of PvP, well, there's the prophecy:

It was fate that drew you together and set you against destruction. This brilliant power can clash even against fate, but you'll be burning out everything you have left, just for the sake of spite.

Don't you have anything better to do?

But, again, this is dark fantasy. Maybe they don't. Give the Templar a roll to throw themselves in the teeth of fate - full damage on a 10+, rolled damage on a 7-9. Assuming your PCs can survive that, either way, the Templar's gotten the chance to express themselves.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Or... the namer does a heroic sacrifice and utters "It's over" filling the clock in total. He changes something about the empowering entity that they pull back their templar now and not in 8 time segments. \$\endgroup\$ – Trish Dec 24 '18 at 8:00

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