23
\$\begingroup\$

I am playing a Fiend-patron warlock. A vampire has charmed my fighter buddy and I wish to use my Hurl Through Hell feature to make the vampire briefly go to the lower planes, resulting in the charm being broken.

The description of the Hurl Through Hell feature says:

Starting at 14th level, when you hit a creature with an attack, you can use this feature to instantly transport the target through the lower planes. The creature disappears and hurtles through a nightmare landscape.

At the end of your next turn, the target returns to the space it previously occupied, or the nearest unoccupied space.

However, I am not sure if the “hell” part is supposed to be merely fluff, with no actual planar travel happening.

Does Hurl Through Hell cancel a vampire's charm effect?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does it happen that you are already in Hell and your Hurl through Hell takes the vampire through the same plane you are already in? As explained in answers at the link, the vampire need not Hurl through the particular plane you are already on, but ... \$\endgroup\$ – Eric Towers Dec 28 '18 at 17:28
26
\$\begingroup\$

Yes; Hurl Through Hell will remove the Charm Effect

The description of the Hurl Through Hell ability starts with the following description:

Starting at 14th level, when you hit a creature with an attack, you can use this feature to instantly transport the target through the lower planes. The creature disappears and hurtles through a nightmare landscape.

The feature says it "transports the creature through the lower planes", the "lower planes" in this context definitely being various alternate planes of existence. The Player's Handbook is direct about what the Lower Planes are, in its description of the various planes of existence, starting on page 301:

Beyond the Material

Beyond the Material Plane, the various planes of existence are realms of myth and mystery. They're not simply other worlds, but different qualities of being, formed and governed by spiritual and elemental principles abstracted from the ordinary world.

[...]

Outer Planes

If the Inner Planes are the raw matter and energy that makes up the multiverse, the Outer Planes are the direction, thought and purpose for such construction.

[...]

The planes with some element of good in their nature are called the Upper Planes. Celestial creatures such as angels and pegasi dwell in the Upper Planes. Planes with some element of evil are the Lower Planes. Fiends such as demons, devils, and yugoloths dwell in the Lower Planes.

So in this case, being "transported through the lower planes" is not merely fluff: by any literal interpretation of this feature (spells and features generally should be interpreted literally) the target creature must, between the attack that took place, and the end of your next turn, exist in the lower planes, and thus be on another plane of reality.

So with the Charm feature of the Vampire being explicitly ended if the Vampire and their victim are on separate planes of existence, it's therefore logical that being on another plane of existence, even briefly, will end the effect:

Charm. The vampire targets one humanoid it can see within 30 feet of it.

[...]

... the effect lasts 24 hours or until the vampire is destroyed, is on a different plane of existence than the target, or takes a bonus action to end the effect.

So if you're looking for a way to instantly end the Charm effect on your fighter friend, and don't have a ready-made way to end Charm effects, you'll be able to attack your Fighter friend the Vampire*, invoke this ability, deal 10d10 damage (55 damage) to them, and end the Charm effect once the fighter and Vampire are in separate planes of existence.

* Of course, because no Warlock would ever attack their own friend, right? ;)

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ I think he wanted to send the vampire through the lower planes, not the ally, but it's the same result vis the Charm \$\endgroup\$ – user47897 Dec 27 '18 at 15:20
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Yeah... I don't think it matters which party goes through hell, but this is a Warlock thing. Considering where they get their power from, they may very well have a tenuous grip on the definition of "friend". :) \$\endgroup\$ – T.J.L. Dec 27 '18 at 15:22
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, I can't explain why I thought they meant to attack their ally. Major Freudian slip, I guess... \$\endgroup\$ – Xirema Dec 27 '18 at 15:26
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @Clockwork-Muse Especially the latter part sounds interesting. I suggest you post a separate question :) \$\endgroup\$ – PixelMaster Dec 27 '18 at 17:53
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ You should quote the relevant bit of the vampire charm ability. In my first reading of your answer I didn't understand that the vampire's charm ends if it's on a different plane, so I thought you were making a blanket statement that all charms end if that happens. \$\endgroup\$ – Ruse Dec 27 '18 at 20:19
12
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, this works fine

There is no such thing as 'fluff' in spell descriptions. Spells in 5e do exactly what they say they do.

Hurl through Hell

...when you hit a creature with an attack, you can use this feature to instantly transport the target through the lower planes. The creature disappears and hurtles through a nightmare landscape...

And the Vampire's Charm power says:

Charm ...Otherwise, the effect lasts 24 hours or until the vampire is destroyed, is on a different plane of existence than the target, or takes a bonus action to end the effect.

So yes, the Hurl through Hell ability does remove a vampire's Charm effect from its victims.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.