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So, thought experiment: weaponizing Dimension Door. No save, no SR, and there are clauses to deal 1d6/3d6/7d6 damage to every traveler (that means you and your target in our case) if there's no room for you right at your destination/100 feet from it/1000 feet from it. Not amazing, but sufficiently fun.

The concept: attempt to take your enemy 1001 feet down, from a ground level. Unless there are tunnels below you, that means damage and no teleportation.

The issue: you take the damage too. That is not efficient in any way.

The solution: is there a way or spell or something to make you immune to (untyped) damage for the shortest of times, like until your turn's end or your next turn?

Bonus credit: any ways to score the 7d6 without a chance of endig with your enemy in an underground pocket?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Pretty sure the creature you take with you has to be "willing" thus not making it effective against enemies unfortunately :/ \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Mundane Jan 9 at 0:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh dear, could have sworn I checked... \$\endgroup\$ – ThanosMaravel Jan 9 at 1:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please don't vandalise your posts, such as by deleting or (in this case) crossing out their entire content. Understood mistakes were made, but revisions should not be destructive: the post should remain readable to visitors. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Jan 9 at 1:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Regardless of the "willing" requirement, note that the only situation in which the 7d6 damage is applied results in "and the spell simply fails". So you only risk ending with your enemy in an underground pocket in the 1d6 or 3d6 options. \$\endgroup\$ – KerrAvon2055 Jan 9 at 3:24
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Ain't gunna happen. Dimension Door only works on willing subjects:

You may also bring one additional willing Medium or smaller creature ...

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Huh. I could have sword I checked. \$\endgroup\$ – ThanosMaravel Jan 9 at 1:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Technically, you can, under the rules, force a creature to be willing. Of course, in such cases, there are vastly more efficient methods of dealing damage, for instance a coup de grace with a scythe, enjoying its automatic ×4 critical hit, and ignoring the any lack of proficiency since you don’t make an attack roll to take penalties on. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Jan 9 at 2:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Doesn't answer the immunity question. \$\endgroup\$ – sirjonsnow Jan 9 at 14:00
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In addition, if you were able to take the creature with you, neither of you would actually end up in the ground. Most displacement spells (dimension door, blink, etc) if you would materialize somewhere where there wouldn't be enough space for all of both you and your other target then you both reappear in a place you will fit and take the damage.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes, the question is specifically referencing dimension door’s rules for handling that: “If there is no free space within 100 feet, you and each creature traveling with you take an additional 2d6 points of damage and are shunted to a free space within 1,000 feet. If there is no free space within 1,000 feet, you and each creature travelling with you take an additional 4d6 points of damage and the spell simply fails.” The whole point is to just use it to deal 4d6 damage. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Jan 9 at 2:56
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The psionic power Damp Power should be close to what you want.

It reduces all dice of damage you take from the next power or spell effect to 1's, thus minimizing how much damage you take. It does have an area of effect augmentation, but obviously you would decline to activate that option for your purposes.

For the purposes of enemies, unconscious or incapacitated counts as willing.


Regarding where you end up, you'll need careful planning to pull it off. Manipulating a creature that can pass through earth and optionally leave a passage would allow you to place an open pocket in the middle of the ground. Then aim for a nearby spot in the ground so that your pocket is the nearest open space. Leave your "willing" companion in the pocket then away you go.

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