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A Sorcerer can create spell slots by expending sorcery points with the Flexible Casting feature.

In the rules, is there any point where it states that you can't have more spell slots than what the table shows?

One method that could potentially allow them to gain more slots than the table lists is by using a particular Sorcerer/Warlock build. The core being that they can take short rests over and over again and, using flexible casting, turn warlock slots into sorcery points and then into normal slots.

Is this supported by the rules?

Does the Sorcerer table show the maximum slots that a sorcerer can have or could they go above that?

Can the Sorcerer create spell slots in levels they don't currently have?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @Deceptecium if you edit that question to only be about slots and the table, it might not be a duplicate, but it would be very close. \$\endgroup\$ – Rubiksmoose Jan 29 at 16:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well whatever I need to do because the answers on the link primarily go over resting and I'm not worried about the resting I am worried specifically about spell casting rules. \$\endgroup\$ – Deceptecium Jan 29 at 16:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ Reopened based on this meta. This is a fairly straightforward question, and if we're going to have multiple questions about this, let's at least have a fairly simple straightforward case where we handle it. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Jan 29 at 16:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ Related: How does "Flexible Casting" give more spell slots? \$\endgroup\$ – David Coffron Jan 29 at 17:03
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    \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, don't worry about digging through that other question too much. We ought to give you a straightforward answer here to your straightforward question rather than leaving you needing to sift through that whole thing. This is reopened now so we can give you that. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Jan 29 at 17:12
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This works

There are no general rules limiting the number of spell slots. The Spellcasting rules only say:

Thus, each spellcasting class's description... includes a table showing how many spell slots of each spell level a character can use at each character level.

This can't be a hard limit on usable spell slots, as you can gain additional spell slots with features such as the Boon of High Magic from the Dungeon Master's Guide:

You gain one 9th-level spell slot, provided that you already have one.

The wizard's Arcane Recovery says (emphasis mine)

Once per day when you finish a short rest, you can choose expended spell slots to recover.

These must be expended slots, but Flexible Casting says:

You can transform unexpended sorcery points into one spell slot as a bonus action on your turn... creating a spell slot of a given level. You can create spell slots...

Any spell slot you create...

All the references to creating slots shows that these slots need not be expended, and since there is no hard limit on the number of spell slots a character can have, a sorcerer can stack up additional spell slots beyond their level's baseline. This includes spell slots of a level beyond those usually available to a spellcaster.

Jeremy Crawford, lead rules designer, supports this interpretation on Twitter:

Using Flexible Casting, a sorcerer can convert sorcery points into spell slots. The number of sorcery points you have is the only limit on the number of slots you can create in this way. (Remember that the slots go away when you finish a long rest.)

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    \$\begingroup\$ What about slots they aren't capable of using such as the 7th level sorc and 5th level slots \$\endgroup\$ – Deceptecium Jan 29 at 17:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Deceptecium again, i see no limit. Appended a clarifying sentence. \$\endgroup\$ – David Coffron Jan 29 at 17:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ FYI Crawford has a lot to say on this matter. I'm pretty sure OP wants RAW and thus it might not be the most helpful but he does explicitly agree with you. \$\endgroup\$ – Rubiksmoose Jan 29 at 17:37

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