1
\$\begingroup\$

Its Benefit states:

Whenever you use feint to cause an opponent to lose his Dexterity bonus, he loses that bonus until the beginning of your next turn, in addition to losing his Dexterity bonus against your next attack.

If you feint as a move action and you are more than likely going to attack from the opening you created, does counts as "next attack"? What if you end your turn with a feint?

Benefit states:

Whenever you use feint to cause an opponent to lose his Dexterity bonus, he loses that bonus until the beginning of your next turn, in addition to losing his Dexterity bonus against your next attack.

  1. Does the target's Dex mod to AC remain negated if attacker attacks the following round if the attacker feinted the round before?

  2. Also on "next attack"...That is a singular attack correct? You cant get multiple hits from extra attacks or 2 Weapon Fighting rules.

EX: a rogue who has 2 attacks at Lv 6 and dual wields daggers attack a target who they feinted the previous round can apply Sneak Attack to only one of his 3 attacks that round?

\$\endgroup\$

closed as too broad by SevenSidedDie Feb 25 at 16:52

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ You have two questions here: one about whether the “next attack” part lasts past the “next turn” part, and one about how many attacks can count as the “next attack”. Please pick one and remove the other from the post, so that it contains only one question. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Feb 25 at 16:53
5
\$\begingroup\$

Base Feint Action benefits

To understand this, you have to take a look at how Feint normally works:

If successful, the next melee attack you make against the target does not allow him to use his Dexterity bonus to AC (if any). This attack must be made on or before your next turn.

In other words, when you perform a Feint, until the end of your next turn, the first attack you make against the target ignores his Dexterity bonus to AC.

Greater Feint additional benefits

Note the wording from Greater Feint (emphasis mine):

in addition to losing his Dexterity bonus against your next attack.

This part of the Greater Feint refers to the normal effects of Feint (mentioned above in this answer). Which simply means that you still get the effect of the basic Feint action when you also have Greater Feint.

So, in addition to the normal effects of Feint, the extra benefit that Greater Feint provides is that the opponent is also denied its Dexterity bonus from attacks made by anyone else until the start of your next turn, as clarified in the FAQ

Greater Feint makes the target lose its Dexterity bonus against all melee attacks by anyone until the start of your next turn, not just you.

There is a significant difference to note here. The basic benefits of Feint last until the end of your next turn while the extra benefits of Greater Feint last until the start of your next turn.

Greater Feint and Base Feint together

These can therefore be seen as 2 separate effects you now have when you feint during a turn:

  1. The opponent is denied his DEX bonus to AC against attacks done by anyone. This lasts until the start of your next turn.
  2. The next time you attack the opponent, that target is denied his DEX bonus do AC. This lasts until the end of your next turn.

Your specific questions

To answer your specific questions:

  1. If using Greater Feint, you can still attack during your next turn and get the benefit for your first attack as usual.

  2. If you make multiple attacks during your next turn, only the first attack will benefit from ignoring the DEX bonus to AC (and apply things like sneak attack). This is because the normal effect from feint still stands, but not the benefit from Greater Feint.

Further clarification and examples

For further clarification, consider the following cases:

  • If you feint, then make an attack before the start of your next turn (for example an opportunity attack), you will have spent the basic benefit of Feint, and during your next turn you will no longer be able to make any attack ignoring the opponent's DEX bonus to AC.
  • If you feint, then make several attacks before the start of your next turn, all of them will benefit from ignoring the DEX bonus to AC due to the effect of Greater Feint. However, like the previous the case, during your turn you will not have this benefit anymore.
\$\endgroup\$
  • 4
    \$\begingroup\$ Aw, man. So I can't use Greater Feint on a dude and walk away then show up 10 years later and make my next attack against the dude, denying him his Dexterity bonus to AC? \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Feb 25 at 12:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @HeyICanChan Technically you could, as long as you never take another turn during those 10 years. (though I am unsure on how you could accomplish that) \$\endgroup\$ – Sdjz Feb 25 at 13:02
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ So I could walk away from the dude on the same turn then take the special initiative action delay for 10 years, and, afterward, if I could make a melee attack against the dude, he'd be denied his Dex bonus to AC? Huh. This plan might be too complicated. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Feb 25 at 13:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @HeyICanChan In all seriousness though, I'm not sure how this interacts with delaying. It may actually be a good question to ask \$\endgroup\$ – Sdjz Feb 25 at 13:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Two Lvl 8 Rogues are out for a stroll, one is a Greater Feinter, the other is a TW Specialist. They decide to have some fun and mug someone. GF uses bluff for a move action feint to deny the mark a Dex bonus then sneak attacks with his standard action. The mark is denied Dex bonus, allowing TW to sneak attack three times causing the poor mark to pretty much 'red mist' ending the incident possibly before they even knew it was happening depending on surprise and initiative order. Um... ouch! \$\endgroup\$ – niekell Feb 26 at 2:12

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.