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Are there any methods to store spells of 9th level at a location, preferably in a manner that can be triggered in a manner similar to glyph of warding? Magic items could be accepted as the answer as well.

It needs to be a method that doesn’t require two 9th-level spell slots; using glyph of warding would require you to cast glyph of warding at 9th level, then the other spell at 9th level as well.

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Boon of High Magic + glyph of warding

You assume in your question that there is no way to get 2 9th-level slots, but you can.

A 20th level wizard that the DM has granted a Boon of High Magic will be able to do this.

The Boon of High Magic says:

You gain one 9th level spell slot, provided you already have one.

Thus you would have 2 9th-level spell slots. One to cast glyph of warding at 9th-level (which then allows it to store a 9th-level spell) and the other to cast the 9th-level spell that you store into it.

Note that the 9th level spell that is cast into the glyph still has to follow all the restrictions laid out in the description of glyph of warding. Also note that Epic Boons are something entirely at a DM's discretion and only they can decide to bestow one on your character.

Spell Scroll of glyph of warding + 9th level spell

If you can get a 9th level scroll of glyph of warding you can use that to cast glyph of warding then 1 9th-level spell slot to cast the spell to store in it.

Spell Scroll + glyph of warding might also work (it will be a DM call)

If you have a Spell Scroll of a 9th level spell, you might be able to use that as the spell to store in the glyph. If the spell on the scroll is one you don't have "prepared" as a character, then (depending on how your DM defines "prepared") it may or may not work. See this Q&A for more debate on this. It is similarly unclear if a scroll of a prepared spell will work (see this Q&A). In short, ask your DM about either of these options.

Wish

As always, the 9th-level spell wish can do anything you want it to (DM permitting) as long as you are willing to accept the risk of never being able to cast wish again. So, you could wish for a 9th-level spell stored in whatever manner you wanted. And, barring any DM twisting of the wish you would be able to do so using only 1 9th-level slot.

Note that you must fully cast wish into the glyph so the cast must make the wish, decide what effects they want, and suffer any stress required just like normal.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If anything, I'd think that it would go the other way around. Part of the point of this combo would be to make Wish glyphs, in an attempt to weasel around the "you cna never cast wish again" effect. Also, "Barring any DM twisting of the wish" is not a trivial bar to set, when you're trying to get two 9th level spell slots out of 1. \$\endgroup\$ – Ben Barden Feb 25 at 20:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ @BenBarden Just to be sure I'm understanding, when you say "go the other way around" are you talking about the order of my two parts? I think I agree with your other sentences, just confused about the first one. \$\endgroup\$ – Rubiksmoose Feb 25 at 20:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm meaning to use the two-slot method to fit a WIsh into a Glyph of Warding. Then you let your fighter buddy trigger it and wish for whatever. Sure, it's possible that he'll forever lose the ability to cast Wish spells, but it's not as big a hit for him as it would be for you. Yes, this involves a decent helping of cheese... but there are DMs out there who would go for it. \$\endgroup\$ – Ben Barden Feb 25 at 20:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ @BenBarden I don't actually think that would work. The wizard has to fully cast the spell to put it in there. That means determining the wish ahead of time and suffering the stress if any is gained. The fighter can trigger the wish, but he can't control anything about it since he doesn't cast it, he is only targeted by it. So this doesn't really allow any way to avoid stress by my reading. \$\endgroup\$ – Rubiksmoose Feb 25 at 20:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ oh, on a tight reading of the rules I agree... but, like I said, there are DMs out there who would go for it. \$\endgroup\$ – Ben Barden Feb 25 at 20:39
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Spell Scroll

"You can store a prepared spell" so the spell you want to store must be prepared but if you can get access to a Spell Scroll with a 9th level Glyph of Warding on it you can use this.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It seems to me that the mage could write their own spell scroll containing Glyph of Warding. \$\endgroup\$ – Codes with Hammer Apr 10 at 14:36
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Timing

If you start casting Glyph of Warding one half hour before you end a long rest, you'll use up your 9th level spell slot immediately. Then, once you finish your long rest, you'll regain the spell slot you need. Then, once you finish casting the spell, you'll inscribe the magic glyph and cast the stored spell into it with your replenished 9th level slot. 16ish hours later, you can start the process again.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ For spells with longer casting times than 1 turn, the spell slot is not expended if your concentration is broken before you finish casting the spell: "If your concentration is broken, the spell fails, but you don't expend a spell slot. If you want to try casting the spell again, you must start over." I'd say you don't expend the spell slot immediately for such spells, only after you finish the act of casting it. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Feb 28 at 1:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ @V2Blast I find the argument that that exception supports the existence of a general rule to the contrary, as argued in the answer I link, to be fairly compelling. It'd be a fine house-rule, though, to change it, and the problem with on-cast effects it begs is already an issue with spells whose casting can be interrupted. \$\endgroup\$ – the dark wanderer Mar 2 at 0:11

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