12
\$\begingroup\$

When do I have to declare that I want to use the Twinned Spell Metamagic on my spell: before the attack roll, after the attack roll or after the DM tells me if it hits or not?

Also do I lose the sorcery points if I have to declare it before the attack roll and it misses?

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Hi Xirem, welcome to RPG.SE! Take the tour to find out how the site works! I'm glad you have found my answer helpful. However, it might be worth holding off on accepting it for a while (such as for 24h or so due to timezone differences for users from other countries) in case other, better answers than mine come along later. Or you can just leave it as-is; this is not a requirement of this site, just a recommendation. You can click the green tick to accept or unaccept any answer at any time should you wish to do so. Have fun and happy gaming! \$\endgroup\$ – NathanS Feb 27 at 11:10
17
\$\begingroup\$

Before the attack roll is made

From Metamagic section, Twinned Spell (PHB, p. 102):

When you cast a spell that targets only one creature and doesn't have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell's level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip).

"When" you cast the spell means that you must declare that you want to use the Twinned Spell Metamagic before the attack roll has been resolved.

This makes sense considering that you are targeting a second creature with the same casting of that spell. If you declared the use of Twinned Spell any later than before the attack roll, then it would be as though you are gaining a second attack, a second casting of the same spell.

Unfortunately, this does mean that, if your attack misses, the sorcery points are wasted.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Also, you make a separate attack roll for each target, right? So even if you could decide after, it wouldn't give you any extra information about whether the sorcery point(s) would be wasted? \$\endgroup\$ – Kazim Feb 27 at 14:44
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @Kazim It might. If there are two of the same creature, you could target one and see what happens. If you rolled high and it missed, you'd know that its AC is too high for you to hit, so you could choose to not Twin the spell because it would probably miss. The rule is written to prevent this. \$\endgroup\$ – anaximander Feb 27 at 14:59
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @anaximander good point, didn't think of that! \$\endgroup\$ – Kazim Feb 27 at 22:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.