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Does 5e have an item interaction?

I could really have some help in understanding how the item interactions work and how they are used during combat.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site! Take the tour. Have you read the Starter Rules (available on the official D&D website)? Is there a specific part of item interaction rules that you need help with? \$\endgroup\$ – MikeQ Mar 1 at 15:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hello Mike, thanks for the welcome! I've been reading some of the guidance on asking questions and I've read 'the tour' now that you've sent me the link. I mostly just need clarification on the rules as I had a dispute with a friend in my group. \$\endgroup\$ – Eddy Bravo Mar 1 at 16:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ Not sure what rules you have but the basics are here on p. 73 if you need to refer to it for your question or the answer \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Mar 2 at 16:10
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You get one free object interaction on your turn.

As part of your turn, you get to interact with one object for free:

Your turn can include a variety of flourishes that require neither your action nor your move.... You can also interact with one object or feature of the environment for free, during either your move or your action. For example, you could open a door during your move as you stride toward a foe, or you could draw your weapon as part of the same action you use to attack.

But a second object would require your action (see the next section of this answer):

If you want to interact with a second object, you need to use your action. Some magic items and other special objects always require an action to use, as stated in their descriptions.

You can Use an Object for a second object.

If you need to interact with a second object, you can take the Use an Object action:

You normally interact with an object while doing something else, such as when you draw a sword as part of an attack. When an object requires your action for its use, you take the Use an Object action. This action is also useful when you want to interact with more than one object on your turn.

There are some exceptions.

The 5th edition of D&D is a game of exceptions. For example, when you attack with a weapon requiring ammunition, drawing the ammunition is a part of making the attack (it doesn't use up the free object interaction mentioned above). There may be other such exceptions. If an object can be interacted with in an exceptional way, the rules for that object, one of your features, or a game option will mention it.

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