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Assuming that I'm using the Bracers of Flying Daggers magic item (from Waterdeep: Dragon Heist, p. 190):

This armband appears to have thin daggers strapped to it. As an action, you can pull up to two magic daggers from the bracer and immediately hurl them, making a ranged attack with each dagger. A dagger vanishes if you don't hurl it right away, and the daggers disappear right after they hit or miss. The bracer never runs out of daggers.

I'm hidden from the creature I want to attack, so I have advantage on attack rolls against him.

Analyzing the item wording, it seems that the two daggers are meant to be thrown at the same time, one for each hand. To sustain this idea, there's the fact that you can't move between those two attacks.

My question is this:

Would I apply advantage from being hidden on both the attacks?

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No, the second attack is not at advantage, you are no longer hidden

The rule from the the PHB p. 195 about attacking from hiding is:

Unseen Attackers and Targets

When a creature can’t see you, you have advantage on attack rolls against it.

If you are hidden—both unseen and unheard—when you make an attack, you give away your location when the attack hits or misses.

If a character is hidden and as its action it attacks, the first attack out of the ones available to it (Extra Attack, the bracers you mention, etc.) is at advantage due to the rule above: "When a creature can’t see you, you have advantage on attack rolls against it".

However the second part of the rule, "you give away your location when the attack hits or misses" refers to a single attack, "the attack", not to the entire Attack action (or the action used with the bracers to attack). This means you have given your position away and any further attacks as part of the same action are not at advantage unless there is another reason for it.

This answer has so far described how the Attack action works with the "attacker is hidden" rules, which is not technically the action described in the bracers item. However this exposes a flaw in the description of the item which introduces significant ambiguity: there is no actual rule for the item specified that allows a RAW ruling about how it exactly works with the hidden rules. As such the only way to answer this question, without diving into potentially complex and un-balancing rules, is to assume that the action used by the bracers to attack works in the same way as the Attack action does. Of course this is now in the realm of DM fiat.

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    \$\begingroup\$ @Carcer: True, it's not the Attack action. But the attacks are still sequential (one after the other) and not explicitly stated as simultaneous. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Mar 2 at 17:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Carcer Valid point. Does what I have added address it adequately? \$\endgroup\$ – Protonflux Mar 4 at 10:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Protonflux sure, I think that looks better. \$\endgroup\$ – Carcer Mar 4 at 18:11
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I do not think you stay hidden after the first attack. Otherwise the Skulker Feat is almost useless, as it states:

When you are hidden from a creature and miss it with a ranged weapon attack, making the attack doesn't reveal your position.

That feat overrides this general rule

Unseen Attackers and Targets
When a creature can’t see you, you have advantage on attack rolls against it.

If you are hidden—both unseen and unheard—when you make an attack, you give away your location when the attack hits or misses. (PHB. p. 195)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to RPG.SE! Take the tour if you haven't already, and check out the help center for more guidance. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Mar 25 at 22:29
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You would get advantage on both of the attacks

Let's have a look at the wording in the PHB:

PHB Page 192:

Attack

The most common action to take in combat is the Attack action,...Certain features, such as the Extra Attack feature of the fighter, allow you to make more than one attack with this action.

PHB Page 195:

Unseen attackers and targets

When a creature can’t see you, you have advantage on attack rolls against it.

If you are hidden—both unseen and unheard—when you make an attack, you give away your location when the attack hits or misses.

Let's differentiate the 'Attack Action' and an attack. A single 'Attack Action' can be compose of multiple attacks, as in the extra attack feature.

Now look at the second part of the 'Unseen Attackers' wording, I think it is implied that it should read:

If you are hidden—both unseen and unheard—when you make an attack action, you give away your location when the attack hits or misses.

Now this is obviously up to interpretation so I'd love to see what other people think too.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I disagree. If that was intended to be read as "Attack Action" it would say so. There are many, many other places in the book where it clearly specifies 'Attack Action' as opposed to 'An Attack.' \$\endgroup\$ – guildsbounty Mar 1 at 17:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ As an addition...if you read that statement the way you are interpreting it, that would also mean that Attack-roll spells gain no benefit from being hidden. Because those are triggered with the 'Cast a Spell' Action, not the 'Attack' Action. Oh...and the daggers thrown from the Bracer are not part of the Attack Action either...they are the 'Activate a Magic Item' Action, as you "Use an action to drawn and throw two daggers from the bracers" not "As part of your Attack Action" \$\endgroup\$ – guildsbounty Mar 1 at 17:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to rpg stack exchange! Please take the tour rpg.stackexchange.com/tour \$\endgroup\$ – Protonflux Mar 1 at 17:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please don't worry about the down-votes on your answer, it is the way that the site works to promote the "best" answer. Literally everyone has answers down-voted at some point, more often early in their "career" here. \$\endgroup\$ – Protonflux Mar 1 at 17:22
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please carry on contributing as it is only with people doing what you are doing, answering questions, that a "best" answer bubbles up for each question. You can even answer a question twice if you change your mind, and leaving the original answer helps people see how the conversation about the question evolved, even though it means people can still down-vote it. \$\endgroup\$ – Protonflux Mar 1 at 17:24

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