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In order to make the Snowcasting feat (Frostburn, p. 50) more useful in warmer areas, or during warmer seasons, I am looking for a source of snow or ice that never melts. This can be a spell that enchants snow or ice in such a way (preferably permanent), or supernatural snow or ice that simply never melts for one reason or another. It could also be a magical item crafted from snow or ice — as long as it fulfills the standards of the feat, and does not melt in warmer climates.

Does such a thing exist in D&D 3.5, and if yes, what ways would there be to obtain it?

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A simple solution is to carry a small chest lined with Blue Ice (Frostburn p. 80). The material's details how to create a room that keeps things cool. Ask your DM if you can create/buy a similarly fashioned chest. Depending on how hot the environment is, you could perhaps even make the chest itself out of Blue Ice.

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The icy strand of the north (Magic Item Compendium p.162) is a string of ice crystals which do not appear to melt.

An ice mephit familiar, (D&D 3.5 Monster Manual p.182) acquired with the Improved Familiar feat, has a breath weapon which creates a cone of ice shards.

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Simulacrums are "formed from ice or snow". Probably the most expensive route to take, particularly consider your DM may rule that using the Simulacrum as a spellcasting material reduces its hp, but I thought it would be worth adding to the list for the sake of completeness.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It may be wise to use a simulacrum of a creature that's not subject to critical hits as that usually means the creature also doesn't have any vital spots. That is, the feat Snowcasting requires a handful of snow, and an ooze simulacrum might react better than a sprite simulacrum when the snow wizard takes out his bladed ice cream scoop! \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Apr 4 at 16:20

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