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In the Unearthed Arcana article "Prestige Classes and Rune Magic", they introduce the idea of prestige classes, a class with only a few levels and more multiclassing prerequisites, borrowed from earlier editions (I remember them from 3.5e, but only via NWN2 rather than the real game).

In the same article, they give the Rune Scribe prestige class as an example. Excluding random homebrew, have there been any other prestige classes for 5e? Since prestige classes were only ever a UA thing, I imagine other UA articles are the only places they would likely have been released, but I was unable to find anything going through them myself. But there may have been some other semi-official source I am unaware of...

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As of now: No

While this might change with future releases, there are no prestige classes, nor rules for such, officially published (outside that Unearthed Arcana entry). There are not any published on D&D Beyond (they don't even list the Rune Magic entry in their UA materials) nor in any of the official books.


As possible sign that this is possibly never coming can be found in said UA article:

Many of the character concepts that were once prestige classes or paragon paths in earlier editions of D&D are now options available to 1st‑level characters. In general, the game’s design aims for maximum flexibility, making options available to all characters.

Indicating that prestige classes is not the way they wish to enable new (and old) character concepts, but rather through new subclasses, as they have been doing (see XGtE in particular).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Don't get me wrong, I completely agree that prestige classes are entirely redundant in 5e since 5e has class archetypes instead, hence I very much doubt we'll be seeing anything new, but I was curious to see if they'd done anything more with this idea back then around about the time when that article came out. Thank you for confirming my suspicion that it was literally just this one article after all. \$\endgroup\$ – NathanS Apr 13 at 9:38

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