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Here are the rules about jumping:

Your Strength determines how far you can jump.

Long Jump. When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing long jump, you can leap only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement.

High Jump. When you make a high jump, you leap into the air a number of feet equal to 3 + your Strength modifier if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing high jump, you can jump only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement. In some circumstances, your DM might allow you to make a Strength (Athletics) check to jump higher than you normally can.

Here are the rules about moving a grappled creature:

When you move, you can drag or carry the grappled creature with you, but your speed is halved, unless the creature is two or more sizes smaller than you.

What I don't know is whether your maximum long/high jumping distance is also halved by grappling. For example, would someone with a Strength score of 20 (granting a normal maximum running high jump of 8 feet) be able to jump 8 feet up with a grappled creature, or would he only be able to jump 4 feet up?

This assumes the 20 Strength grappler/jumper has made the running start beforehand and has enough total speed, even if halved due to grappling, to make the maneuver.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Why do you think jumping takes twice the movement? Jumping 8ft (regardless of whether you're grappling something) costs 8ft of movement, not 16ft. Grappling reduces your speed, it doesn't increase the amount of movement you spend by moving (like difficult terrain does). \$\endgroup\$ – BlueMoon93 May 7 at 17:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Question edited to ungoof my goof. \$\endgroup\$ – Gael L May 7 at 17:14
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It may be shortened if you run out of movement.

You can either:

  • move 10 feet and then long jump [Strength score] feet
  • long jump [Strength score/2] feet
  • move 10 feet and then high jump [3+Str mod] feet
  • high jump [(3+Str mod)/2] feet

And each jump foot is deducted from your leftover movement. Therefore, if you have a high enough speed, then grappling doesn't really bother you.

For example, with 20 Strength and a speed of 60 feet, grappling a creature makes you have a speed of only 30 feet. You can move 10 feet and long jump 20 feet, or high jump 8 feet, which is the same distance you could jump without grappling a target. If, on the other hand, you had a speed of 30 feet, grappling halves this speed to 15 feet. Now, you can move 10 feet and then long/high jump only 5 feet, less than the original amount.

TL;DR: It depends on how much Strength you have, and how much speed you have.

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ In other words, if you have enough movement speed to pay the "foot price", your maximum jumping distance is not affected by grappling ? \$\endgroup\$ – Gael L May 7 at 17:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ @GaelL Precisely! Either by having a high enough speed, or a low enough strength score. \$\endgroup\$ – BlueMoon93 May 7 at 17:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ I would add the explicit clarification that there aren't hidden rules - neither the rules for jumping nor the rules for grappling state that jump distance is reduced, so grappling does not directly affect your jumping ability. \$\endgroup\$ – Carcer May 7 at 17:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ It may also be worth noting the difference between your speed and your movement - even with a speed of 15 feet (halved from 30), you can take the Dash action and get another 15 feet of movement, allowing you to jump the full distance. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast May 7 at 19:17

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