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I have a player playing a half orc sorcerer who's partially in denial about his magic. Wants to be a melee fighter. Recently, the party beat a group of orcs who were putting him down for being half-human.

He wants to use the greataxe the leader was using. The weapon master feat is limited to simple and martial weapons. How can he get proficient at the greataxe, which is a heavy and two-handed weapon?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Do note, however, that a character can wield a weapon they are not proficient with, even if not as effectively as someone who is. \$\endgroup\$ – David Coffron Jul 1 at 12:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ In which rulebook have you seen any mention of "Heavy Weapon Proficiency?" \$\endgroup\$ – krb Jul 1 at 14:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @inthemanual: As that apparent misunderstanding is fundamental to the question, it should be posted as an answer instead. Relevant metas: A question has some facts majorly wrong: should I be correcting them in comments or an answer? \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Jul 2 at 2:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Yash: Rather than addressing your misconception in the question itself (which then invalidates existing answers), you may want to explain/confirm your misconception in a comment on the answer instead. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Jul 3 at 0:54
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He can use the Weapon Master Feat

The greataxe is a martial weapon as listed on page 149 of the Player's Handbook. It also has the heavy and two-handed properties, but these are irrelevant for obtaining proficiency.

Alternately, if your DM allows multiclassing (PHB p. 163), taking one level of Barbarian, Cleric1, Fighter, Paladin, or Ranger you get proficiency with all martial weapons including the greataxe.


1: If choosing either Tempest or War domains.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Looks like I had a major misunderstanding of weapon properties. Simple and Martial are the only two categories that weapons lie in and proficiency is based on this. Heavy, two handed etc. are properties and have nothing to do with proficiency. I didn't realise these were two separate things. \$\endgroup\$ – Yash Capoor Jul 4 at 8:26

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