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In a mythic game I am going to be a cleric/wizard/Mystic Theurge. So I will be using the mythic feat Dual Path so I can select from both Archmage and Hierophant. As all paths gain bonus HP except for the universal, how does the bonus HP work?

If I was limited to one path and universal, I assume I would gain the bonus HP listed in that class, regardless if I was to take either it or the universal ability.

With two paths, what is the HP? Do I get to gain the HP bonus from both, regardless of which path ability I choose?

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You gain the HP of one path.

If we look at Hierophant we see:

Whenever you gain a hierophant tier, you gain 4 bonus hit points. These hit points stack with themselves, and don’t affect your overall Hit Dice or other statistics.

Similarly, Archmage says:

Whenever you gain an archmage tier, you gain 3 bonus hit points. These hit points stack with themselves, and don’t affect your overall Hit Dice or other statistics.

Finally, Dual Path states:

Select a mythic path other than the path you selected at your moment of ascension. You gain that path’s 1st-tier ability (either archmage arcana, champion’s strike, divine surge, guardian’s call, marshal’s order, or trickster attack). Each time you gain a path ability, you can select that path ability from either path’s list or the list of universal path abilities.

Dual Path merely allows you to gain Path Abilities from another Mythic Path. Since you do not gain tiers in that path, you do not get the bonus HP from that Mythic Path.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So even if you select a universal ability you would still get the first paths HP bonus? \$\endgroup\$ – Fering Jul 9 '19 at 3:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Fering correct, the path ability you select has no bearing on the mythic path for which you gain a tier. Instead, the mythic path defines what path abilities you're allowed to take. Note that "universal" isn't a mythic path, but a set of path abilities any path can take. \$\endgroup\$ – william porter Jul 9 '19 at 3:53

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