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If I am currently an Oathbreaker, is it possible for my character to repent for his sins in some way and choose a new a subclass(like redemption) or not?

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    – V2Blast
    Jul 29 '19 at 3:58
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Ask your DM

Page 97 in the Dungeon Master's Guide defines the Oathbreaker. It also has an inset titled "Oathbreaker Atonement". It starts off with

If you allow a player to choose the Oathbreaker option, you can later allow the paladin to atone and become a true paladin once more.

And later continues with

(With your permission, the player can select a different deity or sacred oath than the character had previously.)

The last sentence is the caveat

A paladin who breaks his or her sacred oath a second time can become an oathbreaker once more, but can't atone.

So, yes, provided your DM allows it and your Paladin hasn't Fallen twice. You and your DM should both definitely read that inset before proceeding.

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    \$\begingroup\$ That would make for such an awesome story arc! The paladin that fell, attoned but ultimately was not strong enough to follow the faith. I love it. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 29 '19 at 14:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ @KeineMaster The better arc is a paladin who fell, atoned for it, then broke the oath on purpose because it some virtuous act was more important than keeping the oath, forever damning themselves; they become too strong to keep the oath. \$\endgroup\$
    – Yakk
    Jul 29 '19 at 14:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Yakk If we're already talking off topic Paladin things the trope that paladin oaths are apparently interpreted as a stereotypical evil lawyer would to the point that actions that are clearly within the spirit of the oath even if they violate some literal phrase within it is overused and boring. \$\endgroup\$
    – Cubic
    Jul 29 '19 at 15:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Cubic Alternative explanation: All Paladin Oaths are actually just Wishes to Genies, therefor the words are interpreted as twisted as possible in all cases. Explains why Paladins gain powers from their Oaths rather than just from their Gods (since the latter is just a cleric with extra steps). "In exchange for Paladin Powers (defined in article I, section 2, subsections a-f), I vow to [Paladin Oath here]" \$\endgroup\$
    – Delioth
    Jul 29 '19 at 21:09

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