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From dndguide.com, here is the ability:

Integrated Version–Warforged can integrate weapons into their bodies due to the constructed nature. Warforged can integrate one light weapon, melee or ranged. The weapon they can integrate is the one with which they have proficiency. If not deployed, You can have an advantage on deception and stealth checks to conceal the weapon. Usual focus is required to use integrated weapons to use a handheld one, So you treat using an integrated weapon as a normal weapon.

It doesn't say anything about not being able to forcibly drop it, but it does say that "Usual focus is required to use integrated weapons to use a handheld one, So you treat using an integrated weapon as a normal weapon. "

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    \$\begingroup\$ It looks like this Warforged is from dndguide.com. Dndguide is not an official source of rules, and these rules for the Warforged contradict the official Warforged rules found in Wayfinder's Guide to Everything. For more information on where to find official sources, see this Q&A. \$\endgroup\$ – David Coffron Sep 9 at 13:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ @NautArch I agree; with the language so drastically different from core 5e rules, the only person who could properly answer the inquiry is the original designer of these rules. \$\endgroup\$ – David Coffron Sep 9 at 14:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ So, I'm reopening this because the lack of ability to answer can itself be an answer and lack of possible answers is not a valid closure reason. \$\endgroup\$ – Rubiksmoose Sep 9 at 14:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ This question is being discussed in this meta post \$\endgroup\$ – Sdjz Sep 9 at 18:29
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Unfortunately, you're going to have to ask DNDguide

While discovering 3rd party content can create new and interesting opportunities, there are issues that arise that only the content creator can answer - and this is one of them.

Nonstandard terminology

The race itself is not mechanically described with the standard 5e terminology. The use of the term focus make it very hard to determine what their intent was, which also makes it impossible for us to review the language within the rules of 5e and provide an answer.

Balance is always a concern

You also need to have a weather eye out for balance when including 3rd party materials in a game. A DM is the ultimate arbiter of what they feel is balanced, but be aware that an initial ruling on balance may change on gameplay experience, and you should be willing to roll with whatever decision your DM makes.

Another option from WoTC

If you aren't sure about how to proceed and want to use the Warforged developed by Wizards of the Coast, then you do have another option. Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron included the Warforged race as an option.

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Yes, it can be disarmed.

Usual focus is required to use integrated weapons to use a handheld one, So you treat using an integrated weapon as a normal weapon.

As stated by others 'focus' is not a term used in official 5e materials, so we need to follow the principle stated by Wizards of the Coast regarding language; namely, that in absence of a specific definition, treat a word or phrase as the common usage.
In this case 'focus' is how closely you pay attention to something.

By that standard, 'usual focus' would mean that you put the same effort into wielding the integrated weapon as you would if it werent integrated. As opposed the Wayfinder's Guide to Ebberon Integrated Weapon, which is securely attached.

This means it is possible to disarm you of the weapon, though admittedly does not specify if the weapon is dropped, or simply out of your grip.

In either case, you would still have to contest a Strength saving throw (if the Battlemaster Fighter's Disarming Attack was used), or follow the rules of Grapple contests (if the optional Disarm action was used) to avoid being disarmed; and you would need to use your Object Interaction to re-equip the weapon on your next turn.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't think you can apply WoTC guidance on common usage for language that WoTC didn't write. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Sep 10 at 15:59

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