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The description of the Globe of Invulnerability spell says:

An immobile, faintly shimmering barrier springs into existence in a 10-foot radius around you and remains for the duration.

Any spell of 5th level or lower cast from outside the barrier can't affect creatures or objects within it, even if the spell is cast using a higher level spell slot. Such a spell can target creatures and objects within the barrier, but the spell has no effect on them. Similarly, the area within the barrier is excluded from the areas affected by such spells.

At Higher Levels. When you cast this spell using a spell slot of 7th level or higher, the barrier blocks spells of one level higher for each slot level above 6th.

One of my players is a sorcerer with a lot of heavy-hitting AOE spells. The sorcerer wants to learn the spell to create a safe zone within battle, and then cast the high-level damaging spells.

It clearly cannot move from the location that it was cast at, and remains in a 10-foot circle, but I'm wondering about the limitations to the spell:

  • Can enemies enter the area of the Globe of Invulnerability spell?
  • Can the caster of Globe of Invulnerability leave the circle after it's been cast, or is its existence bound to them being within the circle?
  • And can the caster then cast spells from within it?
  • For an additional clarification, an upcast Fireball cannot penetrate the spell, but a Disintegrate (6th level) could penetrate the barrier - is this correct?
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    \$\begingroup\$ Hi AC Attano, welcome to RPG.SE! Take the tour to learn how the site works, and visit the help center for more info. I've removed the [dungeons-and-dragons] tag as that is just for questions that concern the entire series (all or at least most of the editions); however, thank you for including the [dnd-5e] tag, that's the most helpful one as it tells us the specific edition of D&D you're playing. I've also added the quote notation for the spell description. Hope you get the answers you're after! \$\endgroup\$ – NathanS Sep 30 at 19:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ See also: a number of other questions about the globe of invulnerability spell. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Oct 1 at 8:53
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Spells do what they say they do in their description

Enemies can enter the spell area. The spell itself states that spells cast from outside won't work. Conversely then, spells cast from inside will work.

The caster can leave the circle as the spell says nothing about them needing to stay inside (you could make use of this by grappling an enemy mage and dragging them outside of it).

The caster can cast spells while inside of the sphere to affect others outside of it. The spell is only designed to protect the person inside of it from spells coming from outside as stated in the spell text.

A disintegrate spell can penetrate the globe as it is higher than the 5th level cut off, unless the sphere was cast with a 7th level spell slot or higher.

I'll note that to pull off the trick being suggested, the caster would need to move outside of the sphere while their allies either huddle inside of it or outside of the area of effect of the spells being cast. That has some issues for tactical flexibility, since that restricts the locations where they could be standing. This kind of plan works better as an evocation wizard, since you can make your evocation spells not affect allies within certain restrictions.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Since target: self and barrier springs into existence in a 10-foot radius around you wouldn't the globe move with the caster? (as opposed to if you targeted a spot somewhere...) \$\endgroup\$ – J.E Oct 1 at 9:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ @J.E Good question, it looks like the answer is 'no': rpg.stackexchange.com/questions/128690/… \$\endgroup\$ – aherocalledFrog Oct 1 at 19:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ @aherocalledFrog I see, thanks for the clarification. Reading is hard I guess, totally skipped it in the spell description. \$\endgroup\$ – J.E Oct 2 at 6:35

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