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In Rasputin Must Die! from the Reign Of Winter Adventure path, we are introduced to Automatic Firearm rules. Of interest to this question are the following lines from the relevant text on Automatic Weapons:

A weapon with the automatic weapon quality fires a burst of bullets with a single pull of the trigger, attacking all creatures in a line. This line starts from any corner of your space and extends to the limit of the weapon’s range or until it strikes a barrier it cannot penetrate.

And

An automatic weapon cannot fire single bullets that target one creature.

One person could, in theory, have an automatic firearm to which they could apply the Snap Shot feat.

What happens when someone makes an AoO using such a weapon?

As far as I can tell, one person can get a whole line of people to suffer the AOO along with them, but this seems strange. Though I admit that automatic weapons were probably not written with Snap Shot and the like in mind.

Automatic firearm rules

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RAW, you cannot make Attacks of Opportunity with Automatic Firearms.

An Attack of Opportunity is a single attack that targets one creature. The Automatic quality disallows this form of attack. If you are wielding an Automatic firearm, you cannot make the type of action necessary for an AoO, so you cannot AoO, even though you still threaten with Snap Shot.

This makes some sense; the weapons with Automatic on them are not just any rifle like what we can make today. They're WW1 era Machine Guns. The light variation is 20lbs and, assuming they're using it's real-life size (which is also 20lbs), 45 inches (almost 4ft) long. They're not really "Snap Shot" weapons. It is conceivable that a Pathfinder (and moderately high level no less, by the point you're in "Rasputin Must Die!") could perform better with it, but the rules also don't support it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ (While I agree it would be clumsy for me to use a 4-ft.-long, 20-lb. weapon in an instant, I also have no (physical?) combat training and, on a good day, like, Strength 10. A human Pathfinder fighter is likely much better trained and possesses better stats… as would an ogre! Consider omitting the paragraph about this finding being realistic. :-)) \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Oct 25 '19 at 14:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ I did think about that, but our best trained commandos don't wade into battle snap-shotting LMG's either. Even in video games its a stretch. I'm merely using it as context for a possible reason they wrote in the restriction on Automatic weapons. Real-life examples are slightly more relevant as well because the setting of the referenced material is the real world. \$\endgroup\$ – Ifusaso Oct 25 '19 at 14:59

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