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As far as I'm aware, you do threaten your square:

Most creatures of Medium or smaller size have a reach of only 5 feet. This means that they can make melee attacks only against creatures up to 5 feet (1 square) away.

If a Tiny creature is in your square, I'm used to being able to AoO that, as well.

For movement, it specifies that it's threatening opponents that can take AoOs:

Moving out of a threatened square usually provokes attacks of opportunity from threatening opponents.

But most things simply say that an action provokes attacks of opportunity, and doesn't clarify who is allowed to take them.

It may seem silly to ask if you can AoO yourself, but in certain builds it can actually be useful. Is there any RAW clarification on whether you're allowed to take AoOs against yourself when you provoke?

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No, you can't AoO yourself

The general rules about attacks of opportunity and threatened spaces state that (emphasis mine):

You threaten all squares into which you can make a melee attack, even when it is not your turn. [...] An enemy that takes certain actions while in a threatened square provokes an attack of opportunity from you.

Here it is established that you may make an attack of opportunity when an enemy does something that might provoke one. Descriptions of other actions may explicitly say that they provoke AoOs from opponents, but that's just a restating of the general rule; if an action states that it provokes attacks of opportunity without further qualification, it is implicit from this general rule that the provocation applies to things that consider you an enemy, not to anyone else.

A lenient GM might let you chicane around these rules in situations where it could be beneficial to AoO your allies, but I don't see how you could justify considering yourself an enemy in order to opportunistically attack yourself.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ There we go, that was the general line I was looking for. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – Mike Precup Nov 16 at 19:09

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