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The Grappler Feat states:

You’ve developed the Skills necessary to hold your own in close-quarters Grappling. You gain the following benefits:

You have advantage on Attack rolls against a creature you are Grappling.

You can use your action to try to pin a creature Grappled by you. To do so, make another grapple check. If you succeed, you and the creature are both Restrained until the grapple ends.

The Restrained Condition states:

A restrained creature's speed becomes 0, and it can't benefit from any bonus to its speed.

Attack rolls against the creature have advantage, and the creature's Attack rolls have disadvantage.

The creature has disadvantage on Dexterity Saving Throws.

If on the first turn I grapple a creature, I have advantage on attacks to the creature. On the second turn, I use my action to pin the creature and now we are both restrained.

On subsequent rounds, would I now have neither advantage nor disadvantage when attacking the creature?

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You would have neither advantage nor disadvantage.

You have already quoted all relevant rules yourself except the following, which is taken from the section Advantage and Disadvantage on page 173 of the Player's Handbook:

If circumstances cause a roll to have both advantage and disadvantage, you are considered to have neither of them, and you roll one d20. This is true even if multiple circumstances impose disadvantage and only one grants advantage or vice versa. In such a situation, you have neither advantage nor disadvantage.

Let us take a closer look at what happens when you attack a creature that you are pinning via the Grappler feat.

  1. Since the creature is restrained, your attack rolls against it have advantage.
  2. Since you are restrained, your attack rolls (against anyone) have disadvantage.
  3. Since you are grappling the creature, your attack rolls against it have advantage (by the first part of the feat).

In conclusion, there are both sources of advantage and sources of disadvantage for your attack roll, and the fact that the former outnumber the latter does not matter. As long as both advantageous and disadvantageous circumstances are present, none of them take effect.

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