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I'm playing an Aasimar. They are the type Outsider (Native).

I wanted to find out what impact that has on the game. So I looked up outsiders, and I saw this:

Proficient with all simple and martial weapons and any weapons mentioned in its entry.

Skill points equal to 6 + Int modifier (minimum 1) per Hit Die. The following are class skills for outsiders: Bluff, Craft, Knowledge (planes), Perception, Sense Motive, and Stealth. Due to their varied nature, outsiders also receive 4 additional class skills determined by the creature’s theme.

And a few other cool things.

I'm assuming these don't apply to Aasimar PC's. But my question remains unanswered: what are the ramifications of being a PC that is of the type Outsider (Native)?

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The original rules

Pathfinder’s aasimar, and the Outsider type and native subtype, were inherited directly from D&D 3.5e. Aasimar are found in the Pathfinder Bestiary and Outsider and native are found in the Core Rulebook. These rules had a very clear distinction: types offered features, which applied only to racial hit dice you got of that type, and traits, which all creatures of that type got.

So, by those rules...

Outsider type

An outsider is at least partially composed of the essence (but not necessarily the material) of some plane other than the Material Plane. Some creatures start out as some other type and become outsiders when they attain a higher (or lower) state of spiritual existence.

An outsider has the following features.

  • d10 Hit Dice.
  • Base attack bonus equal to total Hit Dice (fast progression).
  • Two good saving throws, usually Reflex and Will.
  • Skill points equal to 6 + Int modifier (minimum 1) per Hit Die. The following are class skills for outsiders: Bluff, Craft, Knowledge (planes), Perception, Sense Motive, and Stealth. Due to their varied nature, outsiders also receive 4 additional class skills determined by the creature’s theme.

Traits: An outsider possesses the following traits (unless otherwise noted in a creature’s entry).

  • Darkvision 60 feet.
  • Unlike most living creatures, an outsider does not have a dual nature—its soul and body form one unit. When an outsider is slain, no soul is set loose. Spells that restore souls to their bodies, such as raise dead, reincarnate, and resurrection, don’t work on an outsider. It takes a different magical effect, such as limited wish, wish, miracle, or true resurrection to restore it to life. An outsider with the native subtype can be raised, reincarnated, or resurrected just as other living creatures can be.
  • Proficient with all simple and martial weapons and any weapons mentioned in its entry.
  • Proficient with whatever type of armor (light, medium, or heavy) it is described as wearing, as well as all lighter types. Outsiders not indicated as wearing armor are not proficient with armor. Outsiders are proficient with shields if they are proficient with any form of armor.
  • Outsiders breathe, but do not need to eat or sleep (although they can do so if they wish). Native outsiders breathe, eat, and sleep.

The “features” are the benefits of Outsider-type racial hit dice—aasimar don’t have any racial hit dice, so those features don’t come into play. You can tell aasimar lack racial hit dice by how the aasimar monster description has a single hit die, and it’s a cleric hit die and not an Outsider-type racial hit die. If you played some Outsider with racial hit dice—more than one hit die in their monster description, which you will note matches the description of Outsider-type hit dice in terms of hp, BAB, saves, and skills—then those features would matter to you. But not for an aasimar.

On the other hand, you do get all of the traits, or you would except for...

Native subtype

This subtype is applied only to outsiders. These creatures have mortal ancestors or a strong connection to the Material Plane and can be raised, reincarnated, or resurrected just as other living creatures can be. creatures with this subtype are native to the Material Plane. Unlike true outsiders, native outsiders need to eat and sleep.

This removes some of those traits, specifically the traits that say that Outsiders can’t be raised from the dead but also don’t need to eat or sleep. Aasimar can and do.

In short, the effects of your Outsider (native) typing is

  • Darkvision 60 feet.
  • Proficient with all simple and martial weapons and any weapons mentioned in its entry.
  • Proficient with whatever type of armor (light, medium, or heavy) it is described as wearing, as well as all lighter types. Outsiders not indicated as wearing armor are not proficient with armor. Outsiders are proficient with shields if they are proficient with any form of armor.

Note that these are the traits of Outsider (native) creatures in general. They can be further modified by more-specific details, such as your actual race. For example, aasimar with the “halo” alternate racial trait don’t have darkvision.1

  1. Technically, RAW, halo replaces aasimar’s darkvision racial feature and they should still have the darkvision of their Outsider type, but I think most will agree that was likely an oversight.

Advanced Race Guide

The Advanced Race Guide was a later product, which stealth-errata’d this situation, in a most confusing way. Worse, since it wasn’t called out as errata, but—as is Paizo’s wont—pretended it was how the rules always worked, you would never know about the situation until you start working on an aasimar, or similarly-affected race, and notice the contradictions.

Namely, Advanced Race Guide posited the existence of “race types,” which were similar-to-but-distinct-from “creature types.” These had never existed before, and no existing creatures were written with them in mind. These stated that, unlike the clean “features” vs. “traits” split that had previously existed, “race types” only gave proficiency traits if you had at least one racial hit die—in effect, armor and weapon proficiencies listed under “traits” actually became “features.” Worse, this isn’t even spelled out as a special exception—it’s treated as if it were a natural consequence of not having racial hit dice, despite there otherwise being absolutely no reason to think that.

And because Paizo cannot be bothered to admit their mistakes and clarify situations like this, this change in the rules is not explicitly documented anywhere. Worse, later printings of the Core Rulebook and Bestiary make no mention of the change—continuing to suggest the original rules.

In D&D 3.5e, which had specific primacy rules that would handle this situation—and not in Advanced Race Guide’s favor—Paizo has adamantly refused to nail down how contradictions ought to be handled, and instead prefers to use ad hoc FAQ rulings and outright fabrications to pretend their rules always worked in a particular way and that no mistakes were made; they avoid errata in almost all cases, including this one. Now we are left with a situation where Advanced Race Guide contradicts other products, and the only way you can answer your question is by asking your GM for that particular game because the “official” rules are an ambiguous mess that cannot be adjudicated objectively.

Personal ruling

On the surface, full martial weapon proficiency looks like a rather strong racial feature, when you consider that several races get proficiency with a select few martial weapons rather than the complete set. And aasimar are not otherwise weak in a way that would suggest that this extra-strong racial feature is appropriate.

Considering deeper, though... almost everyone who is going to make a weapon attack probably has martial proficiency already from their class. And no one has any particular reason to use different types of weapons, so “all martial weapons” is really the same as “any martial weapon.” Moreover, one martial weapon is much like another—with a few exceptions—so having your choice of martial weapon is only occasionally better than using the fixed proficiencies of some other race. So “any one” isn’t substantially better than “some particular one” most of the time. It is better, no question, but not a lot better. And martial weapon proficiencies are—thanks to the prevalence of full martial weapon proficiency on warrior classes—not that great a racial feature.

Do aasimar need it? No. Is it a better racial feature than they should have? Yeah, probably. Would I actually implement the Advanced Race Guide rule, and not let them have it? No, I would not. Quite simply, it’s an extra complication that isn’t improving things much at all. Humans and half-elves and other races are still dramatically stronger than aasimar are. This advantage of the aasimar isn’t worth causing the headache.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Wow, so a PC Aasimar Cleric can wear heavy armor and swing a giant axe, no matter what god he worships? \$\endgroup\$ – JoshuaD Dec 9 '19 at 1:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't think that's what KRyan is saying at all... in fact, listing all the Outsider traits is very misleading because you follow it up with "You don't get any of these". It's also important to note that some spells don't affect Aasimar... notably anything that refers to "person" (Hold Person, Dominate Person, Enlarge/Reduce Person) because the target is (one) "humanoid" which Aasimar (/Tiefling/Ifrit/Undine/Sylph/Oread) are not. \$\endgroup\$ – Ifusaso Dec 9 '19 at 2:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ @JoshuaD Axe, assuming it is martial, yes, armor, no. Outsiders are only proficient with armor their entry describes them as wearing, which is none for aasimar. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Dec 9 '19 at 2:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you address Ifuaso's point below? It is not clear to me which answer is correct. \$\endgroup\$ – JoshuaD Dec 9 '19 at 19:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JoshuaD Did so. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Dec 9 '19 at 20:37
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Put simply, Outsider(native) is just an alternate of Humanoid(race).

There are no inherent changes to be made that aren't listed on the Aasimar racial features' description.

There are a few interactions with spells that are somewhat important.


You don't have Outsider hit dice, so you will not have any of the features listed under that section unless you play a game with monster races.

When discussing or considering a playable race’s type, it’s type is similar to the corresponding creature type, with a few important differences.

  • The first difference is that each race type assumes members of the race are roughly humanoid in shape and have two arms, two legs, a torso, and a head. This is important so that a race can take advantage of all the various magic item slots available to characters and can utilize the standard weapon and armor options.
  • The second difference is that all of these race types are 0-Hit Dice creatures, which means that their Hit Dice, base attack bonus, saving throw progression, skill points, class skills, and weapon and armor proficiencies are based on the class levels each member of a race takes.
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    \$\begingroup\$ What's the source of that quote? It seems to decide the question. \$\endgroup\$ – JoshuaD Dec 9 '19 at 2:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ Agreed, where is that quote from? Because unless it’s official errata, it’s officially wrong. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Dec 9 '19 at 2:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's visible on d20pfsrd (d20pfsrd.com/races/other-races) but I believe the original source is the Advanced Race Guide. \$\endgroup\$ – YogoZuno Dec 9 '19 at 3:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ @YogoZuno That's older than Bestiary 6 so it would be superseded back to the normal rules from the CRB if that's true. Also I think the CRB has a more recent printing. \$\endgroup\$ – Please stop being evil Dec 9 '19 at 4:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ It is Advanced Race Guide. What in Bestiary 6 supersedes basic PC creation? \$\endgroup\$ – Ifusaso Dec 9 '19 at 5:39

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