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How do the rules on Combining Game Effects and Combining Magical Effects relate to damage types?

Fire Bolts and Fireballs!

I have a question about how to interpret the sections on Combining Game Effects and Combining Magical Effects. I have used fire damage and piercing damage as examples.

Combining Game Effects:

Different game features can affect a target at the same time. But when two or more game features have the same name, only the effects of one of them —the most potent one— apply while the durations of the effects overlap. For example, if a target is ignited by a fire elemental’s Fire Form trait, the ongoing fire damage doesn’t increase if the burning target is subjected to that trait again. Game features include spells, class features, feats, racial traits, monster abilities, and magic items. (DMG p. 252)

Combining Magical Effects:

The effects of different spells add together while the durations of those spells overlap. The effects of the same spell cast multiple times don't combine, however. Instead, the most potent effect—such as the highest bonus from those castings applies while their durations overlap. For example, if two clerics cast bless on the same target, that character gains the spell’s benefit only once; he or she doesn’t get to roll two bonus dice. (PHB p. 204)

To set the scene: Two Wizards, Pyro and Scorchee, enter a tavern, and they bump ito their arch-enemies, Rangers Legolad and Sir Pokealot - a fight ensues! They roll for initiative. L5 characters.

I've had to split it into two scenarios because each presents a nuance as to how to interpret "Combining Game Effects" and "Combining Magical Effects".

Scenario 1: Both Wizards end up with the same initiative. When it comes to choose their actions: both of them cast Fire Bolt at Legolad and are successful in their ranged spell attacks. Does this mean that Legolad takes: two separate sets of damage of 2d10, or only one, because it is the same spell name?

Scenario 2: Both Wizards end up with the same initiative. One casts Fire Bolt at Sir Pokealot and hits; and the other casts Fireball (to the tavern keeper's discontent), and he fails his saving throw. Does this mean that Sir Pokealot takes: 2d10 from the Fire Bolt and 8d6 from the Fireball; or only the damage from the spell that caused more damage, because it is the same damage type?

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The target takes all damage

The key here is:

But when two or more game features have the same name, only the effects of one of them —the most potent one— apply while the durations of the effects overlap.

Both fire bolt and fireball have a duration of Instantaneous. These are not understood to be able to overlap. Turns are taken one after the other, in an order determined by initiative. Having the same initiative does not make turns simultaneous. Ties are always broken (see PHB 189).

Additionally, even if they were to Ready their spells, their reactions would have an order. Every group of effects that would occur otherwise simultaneously should be broken up:

If two or more things happen at the same time on a character or monster's turn , the person at the game table - whether player or DM-who controls that creature decides the order in which those things happen. (XGtE 77)

While this rule is presented as optional, it strongly suggests that an order is necessary and assumed by the rules.

Even if we use a different interpretation, the second example (fire bolt plus fireball) is also resolved by this:

Game features include spells, class features, feats, racial traits, monster abilities, and magic items.

Thus "damage type" is not a game feature in regards to this rule. The spells themselves (which are) have different names and thus can be combined.

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    \$\begingroup\$ For what it's worth the Essentials Kit's description of stacking effects explicitly states that "a duration" is a time of 1 round or more: " Different effects in the game can affect a target at the same time. [...] But when two or more effects have the same proper name, only one of them applies while the durations of the effects overlap (a duration is a time span of 1 round or more). The most potent effect - such as the highest bonus - is the one that applies, or the most recent effect applies if the effects are equally potent. [...]" \$\endgroup\$ – Medix2 Jan 12 at 15:46

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