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The Champion feat Shield Warden allows a character to use their reaction to shield an ally. The feat says:

... When you have a shield raised, you can use your Shield Block reaction when an attack is made against an ally adjacent to you. If you do, the shield prevents that ally from taking damage instead of preventing you from taking damage, following the normal rules for Shield Block.

Emphasis mine. What isn't clear to me is who takes damage when I use Shield Warden, me or my ally. The text says it uses the normal rules for Shield Block, which say:

You snap your shield in place to ward off a blow. Your shield prevents you from taking an amount of damage up to the shield’s Hardness. You and the shield each take any remaining damage, possibly breaking or destroying the shield.

This is unhelpful, because "you" refers both to the person taking damage and the person using Shield Block.

So who takes damage when I use Shield Warden: me or my ally?

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RAW, the ally takes the remaining damage, although this might be unintended

prevents that ally from taking damage instead of preventing you from taking damage

This section implies that your ally will replace you as the actor in the Shield Warden description, so it would be interpreted as

You snap your shield in place to ward off a blow. Your shield prevents your ally from taking an amount of damage up to the shield’s Hardness. Your ally and the shield each take any remaining damage, possibly breaking or destroying the shield.

It sounds bizarre that the impact to the shield would somehow carry over to your ally, who's possibly not even in direct harm's way anymore, so this might not be completely inteded, but is the rules as they're presented.

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Your ally remains the target

The feat does not say that it would change the target of the triggering attack. Instead, you are able to grant them the benefits of Shield Block, as if they had used it themselves. It is still you using the shield, obviously, what changes is the beneficiary of the effect. The last part just emphasizes that the calculation of damages happens the same way and that the shield might also take damage, as normal.

Essentially, you reach out with your shield, interposing it between your ally and their assailant. You do not push your ally or move from your place, so for the attack to target you, it would have to change direction (if you are to the side) or gain reach (if you are behind your ally).

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