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The Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide adds the Elk and Tiger totem spirits as options for the Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian. The Elk totem option for the 6th-level Aspect of the Beast feature (SCAG, p. 122) says:

Elk. Whether mounted or on foot, your travel pace is doubled, as is the travel pace of up to 10 companions while they’re within 60 feet of you and you’re not incapacitated (see chapter 8 in the Player’s Handbook for more information about travel pace). The elk spirit helps you roam far and fast.

I am looking at the level Elk Totem's ability for my next level of Barbarian. Currently most of our travel time has been on foot, but our Noble Half-Elf Ranger wants to get herself a horse-drawn carriage. Would the travel pace of the carriage be doubled by the Elk Totem's 5th-level Aspect of the Beast?

Since both mounted and foot travel is covered by this ability, it would make sense that land vehicles should be as well. Water vehicles and magic vehicles would not be affected. Is my assumption correct?

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There is no definitive answer

As written there is nothing to say whether or not land vehicles should be included (or excluded) in the effect of Elk totem option for the 6th-level Aspect of the Beast from the Barbarians Path of the Totem Warrior. (SCAG p. 122)

Elk. Whether mounted or on foot, your travel pace is doubled, as is the travel pace of up to 10 companions while they’re within 60 feet of you and you’re not incapacitated (see chapter 8 in the Player’s Handbook for more information about travel pace). The elk spirit helps you roam far and fast.

My personal interpretation of the RAW would be to allow basic land vehicles (Carts, Wagons, Carriages) to be included in the effect as long as all passengers in said vehicle are included in the effect, are within range and don't exceed the companion limit. This could be interpreted as a form of mounted travel.

Part of this interpretation comes from the fact that in 5e, there is only a single table for travel pace that applies to all modes of travel. The only benefits to mounted travel are the ability to gallop (a short speed boost that exhausts the mount after an hour of travelling at double speed) and increased carrying capacity. A vehicle only further increases the carrying capacity of the mount.

The reason I would limit it to basic land vehicles is that both water and magic vehicles are not pulled by mounts (in most cases). If you are Captain Jack Sparrow riding on the back of a sea turtle an exception could be made.

An explicit ruling may be needed for the case where part of the conditions are not met, no one benefits from the effect when passengers are involved.

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The Elk option does not affect vehicles.

Elk. Whether mounted or on foot, your travel pace is doubled, as is the travel pace of up to 10 companions while they’re within 60 feet of you and you’re not incapacitated (see chapter 8 in the Player’s Handbook for more information about travel pace). The elk spirit helps you roam far and fast.

If you are riding a vehicle, you are neither mounted, nor on foot. Hence the Elk option offers no benefit.

A lenient DM may allow the beasts that are pulling the vehicle to count as companions, in which case you would travel twice as fast. However, the feature clearly implies that the mounted beasts do not count as companions, let alone beasts that are pulling a vehicle.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't see anything in the books that shows any distinction between on foot, mounted, or vehicle travel paces. They all use the same table for calculating travel pace. The main benefit of having a vehicle in 5e is carrying capacity, which is not part of travel pace. \$\endgroup\$ – Lost Sorcerer Feb 16 at 1:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would also view animals pulling a cart or carriage as a form of mounted travel. \$\endgroup\$ – Lost Sorcerer Feb 16 at 1:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ @RMDan Mounted is defined as "seated or riding on a horse or other animal", this is common sense. The Elk option is exactly the thing in the book that distinguishes "between on foot, mounted, or vehicle travel paces" by omitting vehicles. \$\endgroup\$ – Ruse Feb 16 at 1:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ If you look further down the link at entry 22: a horse, other animal, or sometimes a vehicle, as a bicycle, used, provided, or available for riding. \$\endgroup\$ – Lost Sorcerer Feb 16 at 1:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ @rmdan It sounds like you've got an idea for an answer. It's more than okay to self answer your question! \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Feb 16 at 2:12

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