5
\$\begingroup\$

On the Spell Compendium (p 86) there is the spell Fugue, which has interesting language to describe its effect. The spell description starts with:

Creatures that fail their save become affected by the haunting fugue in semirandom ways. On each affected creature's turn (as long as it remains in the affected area), you make a Perform check....

Does that mean the spell doesn't do anything on my turn when it is cast? If so, do my opponents get the opportunity to use their actions before this takes effect on their turn?

\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

“On each affected creature’s turn...” means at the moment the initiative tracker reaches that creature’s initiative count, i.e. the beginning of their turn. So no, they do not get a chance to act first.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
6
\$\begingroup\$

No as @KRyan states:

However:

Since you asked if the opponents had opportunities to use their actions before this takes effect on their turn, here's some ways they could:

  • They can use attack of opportunities on you

  • Use immediate actions (such as the spell Celerity but Fugue would affect them! Abrupt Jaunt might be a better example)

  • They could have a special contingent spell on them (if it does exist in your campaign and in truth the subject of the spell does not act at all as @KRyan mentionned but it does give it a chance to respond against the spell effect)

  • A creature affected by the spell might be able to push/throw an ally outside of the AOE depending on how it would be placed and not be affected by the spell since his turn has not happened yet (if your DM makes them do seperate initiative rolls), but that would require intelligent creatures for such strategies.

So they do get a chance to do something, but I guess it would rarely happen, just make sure you are out of their melee reach and you should be fine.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Good points all around, +1, though I do have to quibble that contingency doesn’t have the subject act at all—that’s part of what makes it so incredibly powerful. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Mar 21 at 4:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ @KRyan indeed!! \$\endgroup\$ – Maxime Cuillerier Mar 21 at 6:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.