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As a DM I would like to put spell scrolls (magical or otherwise) on exotic surfaces &/or locations. Are there any hard / R.A.W. limits on this? Both scribing & enchantment are expensive in cost and time - obviously complex - yet with minimal description of how this all looks in the end.

Somewhere in the rules (cannot find it now) it was suggested that non-magical / written spells could in or on many places - is this also the case with magical spell scrolls?

Notes: Brief research on paper suggests pressed-wood, skin-leather, cloth-cottons, hemp-grasses &/or papyrus-reeds and more - even inside glass. One assumes fairies or giants write stuff as well. Possibilities abound and seem endless.

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    \$\begingroup\$ “it was suggested that non-magical / written spells could in or on many places” — I think you missed some words in between "could ... in" here \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Jul 15 at 14:55
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There are no limitations

The mechanics of spell scrolls are very much separate from how they must 'look'. It is entirely within your purview as DM to make them look however you'd like - as long they still follow the same rules regarding use and longevity. From the DMG (page 200) on spell scrolls:

A spell scroll bears the words of a single spell, written in a mystical cipher. If the spell is on your class’s spell list, you can read the scroll and cast its spell without providing any material components. Otherwise, the scroll is unintelligible. Casting the spell by reading the scroll requires the spell’s normal casting time. Once the spell is cast, the words on the scroll fade, and it crumbles to dust. If the casting is interrupted, the scroll is not lost.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It might be worth adding a reference to Scribing a Spell Scroll in Xanathar's Guide. It also doesn't add any restrictions on the material the scroll is made from but since it focuses on the creation of them is a more specific source. \$\endgroup\$ – Quentin Jul 15 at 15:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ To add to this, having found scrolls be on novel items could be very interesting. Maybe a scroll made by an ancient forgotten dwarven empire is inscribed on a metal hammer that rusts away when cast. An ancient elven scroll written on the leaves of a small plant that needs neither water or light to stay green, but withers away when cast. Maybe a turkey leg that has to be eaten as part of the spell. Or a Magic Missile that's a dart you throw as the somatic component. There are no limitations aside from your imagination. \$\endgroup\$ – aslum Jul 15 at 15:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Quentin The Scribing rules are optional and also don't really have any specific interaction that's different than the general spellcasting rules in the DMG. I don't think it'd really do anything to improve the answer, but thank you! \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Jul 15 at 15:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Seems like you could use "it crumbles to dust" to destroy things. Make a spell scroll on a door, cast the spell, the door crumbles to dust. \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Markov Jul 15 at 16:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ @ThomasMarkov, I could see someone chiseling a 1st level spell on to the wall of a castle and then say the castle needs to crumble to dust when cast \$\endgroup\$ – MivaScott Jul 15 at 17:46

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