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My question is simple:

Can an item (clothes, rings, anything really) be enchanted to change the form of the clothes a person is wearing into other clothes of their decision?

I'm new to D&D and want to play a changeling, maybe not this campaign but sometime in the future. The changelings sound awesome but they can't change their clothes which kinda ruin the whole personas thing if someone saw you wearing the same clothes before you transformed.

I know there is something called Glamoured Studded Leather, but from what I understand it just make an illusion to look like other clothes, while I prefer to have actual clothes to fit the persona in order to not have an awkward situation or have to explain stuff to NPC and such.

So can it be done? Or is changing the form of items not really a thing? Or maybe the Glamoured Studded Leather can be tweaked or changed to actually take the form of other clothes?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Is there a specific reason that just the appearance changing effect from the Glamoured Studded Leather isn't acceptable? As far as I can tell, the illusion is both visual and tactile, so what particular awkward situations would arise that would be different than if the item actually changed? \$\endgroup\$ – RevenantBacon Aug 12 at 13:21
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You should look into Shiftweave. It is from the same setting as Changelings (Eberron):

When a suit of shiftweave is created, up to five different outfits can be embedded into the cloth. While wearing the clothing, you can speak its command word as a bonus action to transform your outfit into your choice of one of the other designs contained within it. Regardless of its appearance, the outfit can’t be anything but clothing. Although it can duplicate the look of other magical clothing, it doesn’t gain their magical properties.

Note that this actually changes the clothing, it does not merely create an illusion.

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It exists in moderation

Beyond the Glamoured Studded Leather, there is something called the Cloak of Many Fashions:

While wearing this cloak, you can use a bonus action to change the style, color, and apparent quality of the garment. The cloak’s weight doesn’t change. Regardless of its appearance, the cloak can’t be anything but a cloak. Although it can duplicate the appearance of other magic cloaks, it doesn’t gain their magical properties.

I bring this up because it brings up a big point; it's a cloak and must remain a cloak, and it will not gain the magical abilities of a cloak it imitates.

Why is this big? Because picture a fighter with a shirt that can change not just appearance, but actual physical properties.

Walking through a dungeon, they keep the shirt as a shirt. But when they predict combat they switch it to chainmail!

The means, that they no longer have the penalty of time to don/doff the heavy armor. Nor do they have a disadvantage to stealth while walking normally. Now consider a ring that could become a shield. A floppy hat that becomes a full helm. You get the picture.

This also infringes on the "disguise kit" and its proficiency, and is even better than the Disguise Self spell. If a character could quickly duck around a corner and completely change their appearance.

So while there are smaller ramifications for a cloak change, changing the actual properties and tailoring of an entire outfit can easily become over powered.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "to don/doff the heavy armor". Thus the constant-weight restriction. \$\endgroup\$ – Kevin Kostlan Aug 12 at 5:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @KevinKostlan the weight is not the main problem of don/doffing armor suits \$\endgroup\$ – STT LCU Aug 12 at 7:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ "The means, that they no longer have the penalty of time to don/doff the heavy armor." This is essentially what the Glamoured Studded Leather does though. It's appearance changes, but is still armor that they don't have to spend time changing in to. \$\endgroup\$ – RevenantBacon Aug 12 at 13:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ @RevenantBacon, exactly. Which is what the OP didn't want. It's just an illusion. They are asking for a magical article of clothing that actually changes. I am envisioning something like changing from farm hand rags to a tailored suit; like a polymorph clothes spell. But without proper rules in place (like the cloak I gave as an example) what would stop someone from changing the farm hand rags into full plate mail? \$\endgroup\$ – MivaScott Aug 12 at 16:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ So you're arguing for the item to have more downside than the GSL? I don't really see the point. Well, I also don't see why illusory changes aren't good enough, but that's a question for OP to deal with, not you. Like, what's the difference between them appearing to be farmer rags and them actually being farmer rags? \$\endgroup\$ – RevenantBacon Aug 12 at 19:37
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Well, of course!

I happen to play a bard (female elf, chaotic evil) who does exactly that: she is a producer (and consumer) of the finest crafts you could find: perfume, fine cloth, you name it. She can craft all sorts of goods, but is especially good in making women's dresses. After gaining access to level 6 spell slots, she has begun to produce a special kind of dress:

A fine crafted dress enchanted with a level 6 spell "major image". Since it is level 6, the illusion is PERMANENT, and there is no restriction on what the illusion exactly does. So you can cast it on a piece of cloth and make it look like it's on fire, or a swarm of shining butterflies surrounding it. We use this mostly for "skins" (as my friends call them), but you could, however, cast a camouflage pattern or even something more exotic like a illusion that makes you slightly invisible by breaking light around you.

This is by no means flawless, as you can always "dispell magic" the dress, but you'd need a high spellslot for it, and you would not gain anything from it other then destroying a valuable piece of clothing (like in: you cut your best dress open, it's your fault).

These dresses gain a huge amount of value since royal people are always interested in extravagant style, thus my bard gains access to the rich and wealthy, and since she's mainly an enchanter, she can mind-controll a rich person easily and rip of all their values. Of course it helps if you can produce more goods, like all sorts of magical perfume, or have access to magical fibre that generates more and more value on a single dress.

I hope this could help you.

[EDIT: I just realised after again reading your initial comment, that you seem to mean "change the appearance at will" , well, those surely exist too, like a "hat of disguise", but it's more common and practical to have somebody burn a low-level spell slot to disguise the whole party rather than producing something like said hat]

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